Newsworthy nudity, 2021-2

  1. What it’s like to be a life model and pose nude for strangers (2/12/21)

    In the previous edition of this series there was an article about how posing nude as an artist’s model can be a source of empowerment. That was from a male perspective. This article provides a female perspective. It’s noted that “Disrobing in front of a room full of other people who are intently staring at you is way out of most peoples’ comfort zone.” For experienced naturists this should be no problem at all. But it should also be considered by anyone who’s not deathly afraid of being seen naked by others, because it could enhance their self-confidence, and is often a modest source of extra income. Also, of course, it could entice people into trying naturism.

    One problem for many who may be interested in posing nude as a life model is finding a class that’s looking for models. Anywhere that art classes are offered is a possibility. That includes college and junior college art classes, places offering adult education classes, and sometimes classes at art museums. Two related articles (here and here) describe what’s involved in modeling. It’s noted that the average pay for modeling is about $25 per hour, but that probably assumes at least some modeling experience. However, for anyone who wouldn’t mind working naked, the pay could be a secondary matter.

  2. NAKED a Life Modeling Film about Life (2/20/21)
    Review of the film: Irish Film Review: Naked

    The Irish Naturist Association held a virtual event to view a documentary film and discuss it with the film’s director and his life model. The film is available to rent, but the INA provided a review (second link). There are many interesting observations, but the overall message is that “life modeling is empowering.” As one model notes, “once the threshold of fear was crossed, the idea of posing naked was no longer fraught with difficulties.” There’s a great deal for naturists to think about in these observations. In particular, being open about one’s enjoyment of naturism is also empowering. Another comment from the director recognizes a fundamental obstacle naturism faces almost everywhere: “There is a culture of silence against nudity worldwide in the mass media today, and I think it’s very unhealthy.”

  3. Get Naked Australia founder reveals the best things you can do nude from hot air ballooning to rock climbing (2/15/21)

    Get Naked Australia is an organization known to many naturists worldwide through its social media sites on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. The idea originated with Brendan Jones in 2015 and soon became quite popular with young people in Australia who travel to many natural sites in the country to enjoy nudity and be photographed naked. Judging from the photographic evidence, women are well represented in GNA activities, which are quite varied. They include small yacht cruises, rock climbing, hot air ballooning, yoga retreats, camping, and (of course) skinny dipping.

    Such things understandably appeal especially to younger people more than visits to established naturist parks and resorts. The U.S. is desperately in need of young people like Brendan to revitalize naturism in this country. Many young people resist being labeled or regarding their activities as part of a “lifestyle”, and so the idea to just “Get Naked” may have more appeal. (Here’s a similar article on GNA.)

  4. 12 Activities To Try During National Nude Recreation Week (6/18/21)

    This article continues the theme of appealing ways to get naked – other than visiting the more traditional RV parking lot with a swimming pool and clubhouse. “National Nude Recreation Week” is proclaimed (yearly, after July 4) by U.S. naturist organizations to promote naturist activities. To come up with a full list of 12, the article mentions a few rather obvious things (get an all-over tan, skinny dip in the pool) and some stereotypical naturist games involving spherical objects (volleyball, pickleball, golf). So, up to 5 already. Then there are 5k nude races. (Sounds a little strenuous, but 5K is just a bit over 3 miles.) And you can work out at the resort’s gym or practice yoga.

    But other things are possible beyond naturist ghettos. There are World Naked Bike Rides and celebrating World Naked Gardening Day (usually outside the proclaimed week). There’s always naked hiking – anywhere you probably won’t be seen by textiles. And, finally, there are nude cruises – if you can afford them and book far enough in advance. No mention, however, of life modeling or simply having a clothing-optional party for friends in your own home. All-in-all, this isn’t quite Get Naked Australia stuff.

  5. Charlie Max Thinks We Should All Be Cooking Nude (5/26/21)

    Here’s one more thing that’s best done naked. Max is a model and an “OnlyFans creator” – which means she offers NSFW content (for a price). Not having checked that out myself, I can’t say it’s strictly of the naturist sort. But Max does emphasize naturist values in this article. Cooking is certainly another natural activity that can be enjoyed totally naked (with sensible precautions about things that could burn).

    Max makes healthy living in general a priority. In particular, that means “plant-based cooking”. But she also advocates body positivity and nakedness. She argues that food should not only be prepared while nude, but also served and eaten while clothesfree. Max hosts dinner parties for friends while nude herself (with clothing presumably being optional for guests). “Finding comfort, support and acceptance in being nude around my friends allowed me to feel confident in my body,” she avers. Naturists certainly can understand and agree with that.

  6. I tried cooking in the nude (so you can too) (8/4/21, updated 4/25/22))

    Hannah Cole has a positive response to Charlie Max’s article. However, body insecurities and aversion to cold somewhat limit her enthusiasm, as they also do for many naturists. She nevertheless summarizes briefly many good features of naturism. Hannah notes that “Other practising nude cooks mention they feel more creative and less restricted when crafting meals this way.” (The same could be said of many other creative activities, like writing or even software programming.) She goes on to recount her first fully nude cooking effort – especially how “Being in my house sans clothing was cleansing.” In conclusion she says she’s now “open to a more nude-inclusive lifestyle.” The takeaway here is that finding even one activity one can really enjoy naked opens the door to additional involvement in naturism.

  7. Reasons Why Everyone Should Try Skinny Dipping At Least Once (7/3/21)

    The information here is mainly about why skinny dipping is really enjoyable, but there’s a little advice about what people having no experience with skinny dipping should know. This information usually won’t be new to most naturists, unless their experience being naked is mostly in their own homes. Naturists who already know most of this – if they’re open to discussing the subject with others – may be better able to know what information about skinny dipping they should offer to friends. People with little or no naturist experience but are curious about skinny dipping should find the whole article useful.

    The article’s not long, so just read it for the details. People, of course, should already know about things like using sunscreen and what hazards may exist in specific places. Such information applies to swimming anywhere, from a private pool to a popular ocean beach. There probably should be more advice about good naturist and nude beach etiquette. But mainly the information is about why skinny dipping is such a great pleasure – although naturists can make many good points from their own experience, even if they seldom skinny dip.

  8. Going Bare (7/22/21)

    Here are some further thoughts on nudity from Yael Wolfe. She probably wouldn’t think of herself as a naturist, and isn’t advocating nudity at home as a regular practice (the way a naturist might). But she does write about the value of experiencing nudity occasionally for its own sake. “Learning how to be in my body without making judgments about how it measures up to cultural beauty standards. Without feeling dirty, obscene, and shameful.” Because “It feels like liberation. Painful liberation, but liberation all the same.” In other words, exactly what naturists often advocate as a means for body acceptance.

  9. The Sheffield duo who interview strangers completely naked – and how it’s changed their lives (2/6/21)

    Kat Harbourne and Jenny Eells are BBC journalists who in 2017 conceived the idea of doing a podcast in which they as well as guests they interviewed would be naked. The initial idea was to explore issues around body image (just as Yael does in the item just above). It’s called (of course) The Naked Podcast. Although the podcasts concluded after 67 episodes in October 2020, all the episodes are still available at the link just mentioned. It was also written about on this blog: here.

    The present article, which asks how it changed the podcasters’ lives, appeared 4 months after the last episode. Both Kat and Jenny feel that “doing the series for the past few years has helped them and their own body image.” Kat observed that “you don’t need to look or act a certain way to love your body – you don’t need to be a certain size to be happy.” So here again is a message about body acceptance. Naturists simply can’t repeat that enough.

  10. Florida Beaches Guide – Haulover Beach (7/11/21)

    Haulover Beach, just a little north of Miami Beach, is easily the most popular clothing-optional beach in the state. In part that’s because of its proximity to a large city. But it’s also thanks to the efforts over a number of years by the South Florida Free Beaches organization. Thanks to SFFB, Haulover is one of the very small number of U.S. beaches that have an official clothing-optional portion, and the organization maintains a “Beach Ambassador” program to ensure that Haulover remains a safe and enjoyable place, even for families. Tripadvisor has more information on Haulover.

Bonus from earlier: Are you a Naked Person? (3/10/11)

Alden Wicker believes, “Your comfort with nudity says a lot about who you are.” She explains further, “I’m not asking if you’re a nudist, an exhibitionist, or a Playboy model. I’m just asking if you’re comfortable in your nakedness.” In more detail, “I think your view of nakedness says more about you than how conventionally beautiful you are. … I’m not saying naked people are better; they just approach life differently.” So here’s one more affirmation that getting comfortable with ordinary nudity is a dependable facilitator of body acceptance.

Newsworthy nudity, 2021-1

Obviously, there’s been a long gap since the last “Recent articles on nudity and naturism” here, which was for January 1-15, 2021. Two reasons: the relevant newsflow does seem to have slowed down, but even so, time constraints have made it difficult to keep posting new articles on this theme twice a month. So I’ll try a different approach.

Many interesting articles have been noted since January 2021. So the best of those will be included in the new series, as well as anything suitable that comes out in the future. But there won’t be any fixed posting schedule. It will just happen as time permits, and selected items won’t necessarily appear in chronological order. Also, there will usually be less commentary on individual articles than in the past. These changes may allow new posts to appear as often as before.
Continue reading “Newsworthy nudity, 2021-1”

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, 1/19/20

  1. Dating & Nudism
    Isn’t this something that most naturists who aren’t in a long-term relationship wonder about? The conventional wisdom is that the best way for a naturist to find a compatible date is not to search for someone who’s already a naturist. Why? Partly because of the well-known gender imbalance problem, if for no other reason. In particular, a naturist man would be doing naturism itself a favor by finding a dating partner who’s not already a naturist and persuading her of the many healthy and wholesome features of social nudity. (Just for this point, assume heterosexual dating.)

    The article cited is from the new Our Natural Blog of Sam and Aleah. (Previously referenced in this post.) The very first point made there is to focus on people outside the naturist community – because otherwise the task “is like looking for a needle in a haystack. It would severely limit your dating pool and probably end up working against your dating success.” A corollary of this point is that if you want to find a compatible date, you’ll have to be able to make an honest and persuasive argument for the benefits and reasonableness of naturism. So you’d best have a fair amount of naturist experience yourself in order to be considered a knowledgeable source of information.

    The next point is to focus strongly on compatibility. You need to find a person who’s not only open-minded enough to seriously consider naturism, but also shares a variety of interests with you that have little to do with naturism. For example: activities and hobbies, philosophy of life, previous experiences, and life goals. Even if your ultimate objective isn’t a long-term relationship, you want whatever you do together to be enjoyable for both of you. There’s a lot of additional great advice in the article – so just go read it if you’re seriously interested in naturist dating.

    Here’s another fine article about naturist dating on the Meandering Naturist blog from about a year ago

  2. Why is this artist photographing random naked people in random spots on the streets of Vienna?


    Martin Gabriel Pavel (MGP) is a Czech photographer who has been doing a series of photos, called “Daily Portraits”, since 2011. All portraits are of models who are naked or semi-naked volunteers, and who pose at a wide variety of urban locations in Austria and other nearby countries. (The headline is misleading, since MGP doesn’t work only in Vienna.) The portraits are eventually collected into books, which are sold to support MGP’s work. The images are quirky and sometimes surrealistic instead of straightforward personal portraits – in other words, “artistic”. Viewers are left to make their own interpretations, but in general the images raise questions like “What is the deeper meaning, if any, of this naked person in this particular place?” And “What is the subject feeling about the experience?”

    When asked by the interviewer to explain the “concept” of the series MGP is currently working on, he says “Each series has a different concept. In the last series in Berlin, 381 people were photographed naked, and those who were photographed, also took photos of other strangers. For example, I photographed Elle in her apartment, then I gave her my camera and she went and photographed another stranger in his apartment, and so on.” So, in part, the work is about random people who are willing to be photographed naked and possibly to then photograph others, also naked. Inevitably, too, the work is about nakedness itself. MGP says, further, “The aim of this series is to capture a feeling, the atmosphere of the city through pictures of the naked body.”

    All subjects, of course, gave consent, and often enjoyed the experience enough to tell friends about it and encourage them to volunteer also. MGP says that “Most of my models have never posed naked before. They feel empowered after the experience.” It seems unlikely that this sort of work could be done in the U. S. – or probably in most other countries besides where MGP works. Not only have many people without previous experience posing naked volunteered, but it seems that local police and the general public very seldom object to the project. Unlike the work of Spencer Tunick – most of whose subjects are simply anonymous “bodies” – MGP’s subjects are (mostly) distinct, identifiable people. One wonders whether nudity is already more “normalized” in the places where MGP works. Certainly, the books that are produced as a result are a great example of “normalizing nudity”.

    Some useful links for MGP: home page, Twitter account, Instagram account, Daily Portrait site, book sales.


  3. Alton Towers hotel is being taken over by nudists for a clothing-free weekend for families
    Unless you’re British, this is a bigger deal than it might seem. According to Wikipedia, “Alton Towers Resort is an amusement park in Staffordshire, England, near the village of Alton, which … incorporates a theme park, water park, spa, mini golf and hotel complex.” So it’s not just another water park, several of which in the UK occasionally host naturist groups for private swims. According to the resort itself, it’s “the UK’s biggest Theme Park”. In other words, much more like Disneyland, and in fact it offers more: a water park, spa, and mini-golf.

    Even though the event isn’t scheduled until the weekend of November 20-22, it’s received coverage from a number of UK news outlets (links below). Most importantly, it has been organized by British Naturism – the UK’s official naturist organization. Nudity’s allowed 24/7 in the waterpark and hotel areas. (Because of the season, most outdoor facilities won’t be open.) The place will be closed to the general public (although presumably anyone can attend if they pay the admission, aren’t bothered by nudity, and belong to or join BN or INF). Accommodations for two nights and use of facilities are priced at £325 (about US$423) for a family of four. And children of all ages are welcome. This will actually be the 14th year for the event. More than 400 naturists are expected to attend. (The limit’s probably dictated by the number of hotel rooms available.)

    Here’s the official announcement and reservation page. Can anyone among U. S. naturists imagine either (or both) of the U. S. naturist organizations taking over even part of a Disney property for a weekend?

    More: here, here, here, here, here, here

  4. BBC to screen two hours of ‘slow TV’ cameras panning around naked bodies of life drawing models… in the hope that viewers will sketch them at home
    If you’re like most people in the U. S., outside of major urban areas or far from large universities, it can be quite difficult or impossible to find places where you can sketch or paint naked life models. The same is true (possibly to a lesser extent) in other modern countries. But now in the UK the BBC has a solution. According to the article,
    Budding artists will be given a lesson in life drawing from the comfort of their own home in a two-hour special on BBC Four. Life Drawing Live, an interactive class where viewers can draw the nude models on their screen, will make television history on highbrow channel BBC Four. Billed as an art lesson for the whole country, the special could be the first of many interactive cultural programmes. The audience will be asked to draw along from their living rooms as the class is led by award-winning artists Daphne Todd and Lachlan Goudie.

    The BBC cameras will pan slowly around the room so that viewers have time to quickly sketch models. However, it’s unclear whether this will be repeated regularly instead of being a one-off event. And the article doesn’t say when the broadcast will occur, except “early” in 2020. Anyone outside of the UK, of course, is still SOL. In any case, people anywhere can go to YouTube or Vimeo, search on “life drawing” or “life modeling” and come up with videos that offer pretty much what BBC plans to do. Better still, you can watch the videos as many times as you need to improve your drawing skills. Perhaps the BBC thing is more of an attention-grabbing stunt. But at least the BBC will offer something that many people would otherwise not even think of trying.

  5. What is Naked Therapy?
    The article answers that question:
    Naked therapy is a form of mental health treatment that isn’t sexual in nature. It helps people become more comfortable with their bodies. It began in the 1930s when Howard Warren, who is a Princeton psychologist, and at the time was president of the American Psychological Association, spent a week’s time at a nudist camp in Germany. After that, he wrote a paper called “Social Nudism and the Body Taboo.” Warren discovered that being naked made people feel more comfortable with themselves; less self-conscious.

    The article’s about body acceptance. It’s actually targeted at men, and published on a men’s site, even though body acceptances is more often considered a women’s issue. Of course, most naturists have already realized that being naked socially is quite enjoyable, as well as providing emotional and psychological benefits. “Therapy” means participating in an organized group where people are naked and explicitly discuss body acceptance issues under the guidance of a trained professional. In other words, it’s a way for men (and women) who aren’t already used to social nudity to discover and experience some of its psychological benefits. A naturist might want to investigate naked therapy to recommend to friends and relatives who have body acceptance issues.

    Naked therapy was a popular thing back in the 1960s and 70s, although it was sometimes associated with open sexuality, drug/psychedelic use, and other counter-cultural fads of the time. As this earlier article explains, naked therapy is much less used now, although it can be experienced with some online sources. Truthfully, however, for people whose body issues aren’t too severe, visiting a good naturist club or resort a few times – or just being naked often at home – is simpler and cheaper. But for more serious issues, a professional counselor or therapist may be better.

  6. How to Cover Nudists the Wrong Way
    Here’s another plea on Matthew McDermott’s blog for mainstream journalists to write intelligently about naturism. I’ve already cited here an earlier article by Matthew about this. Any naturist who interacts with journalists needs to understand the biases and habits that journalists bring with them. At the end of the new article are four key suggestions that naturists and their clubs should keep firmly in mind.

    Consider some examples of the language some journalists use to slyly disparage naturists and naturism – from this article about the Alton Towers event described above. The headline reads “Alton Towers water park set to be overrun by nudists for a ‘weekend of fun'”. It says the park will be “overrun” – like a plague of locusts? – by naturists. And notice the use of scare quotes at the end. The first sentence uses “descend on” instead of “overrun” – but implies the same comparison to locusts. Most of the remainder of the article is straight from the British Naturism announcement. However, the last four sentences repeat the often alleged but never verified charges by a “paedophile hunter” of the supposed dangers tp children of such events. So the writers continue to gratuitously repeat a nonexistent link between naturism and pedophilia. Also questionable is continuing to write “nudists” instead of “naturists” – where the latter term is now more common in Europe, and in England itself.