Newsworthy Nudity, 2022 -2

  1. The History Of Nudism (1/5/22)

    Gary Mussel, who’s been an activist for naturism and an official of various naturist organizations, offers a birds-eye view of the history of naturism. Open, unproblematic nudity has occurred frequently in human societies as long as humans have existed, especially in regions with mild climates. Occasional open nudity wasn’t unusual even in various more “modern” urban societies until a couple thousand years ago. Even within the past 100 years or so, bathing naked in rivers, lakes, and the ocean wasn’t unusual (at least for males). But, of course, historical trends such as urbanization and religious dogmatism gradually stigmatized nudity.

    However, trends may eventually reverse when extremes are reached. In Europe, the “Romantic” writers lamented the increasing alienation of humans from the natural world. In the U.S., somewhat later, writers like Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau echoed those sentiments. Finally in Germany in 1894 Heinrich Pudor (using the pseudonym Heinrich Scham) openly advocated for naturism in a short tract entitled Naked People. It was optimistically subtitled “A triumph-shout of the future”. 9 years later, the first known nudist park, Freilichtpark, was opened in Germany by Paul Zimmerman.

    After the First World War, nudism caught on in Germany, and (partly thanks to German tourists) in France later in the 1920s. Spielplatz opened in England in 1929 – and has operated continuously since then. Mussell traces the further evolution of nudism (and naturism) in the U.S. thanks to people like Kurt Barthel, Bernard MacFadden, and (especially) Ilsley Boone. Boone took over Barthel’s American League for Physical Culture in 1931 and renamed it The American Sunbathing Association. He also bought an existing property, Sunshine Park, in 1935 and located the ASA office there.

    Boone was quite a controversial figure. He lost control of the ASA in 1951, and in 1994 it was renamed The American Association for Nude Recreation (AANR). The bulk of Mussell’s historical account goes into many details of the history of nudism/naturism in the U.S. in Boone’s time up to (almost) the present day.

    Unfortunately, as Mussell writes, “At AANR, there has been a steady decline in membership over the past decade from a 50,000 peak in 1998 to under 30,000 in 2015.” The number of affiliated clubs has also dropped from a peak of 270 to about 180 currently. Mussell suggests, however, that “even as the number of “card-carrying” nudists may be getting smaller and grayer, nude recreation continues to grow as more people choose clothes-free vacations.” Naturists need to work harder to ensure this isn’t just wishful thinking.

  2. Spielplatz Naturist Club: The secrets of the famous nudist resort hidden in Hertfordshire (1/14/22)

    Spielplatz, the British nudist club mentioned above, was established in 1929 by Charles Macaskie and his wife Dorothy near the village of Bricket Wood, about a 40-minute drive from central London. Although it covers only 12 acres, it has about 50 full-time residents and admits naturist visitors during the summer season. Although originally situated in a wooded area, there’s now a small suburban area east of it, and another naturist park, British Naturism’s Sunfolk, next door to the south. Spielplatz is the oldest surviving naturist place in England, and the only one having full-time residents.

    The Macaskie’s daughter, Iseult Richardson, inherited the property and managed it until passing it on to her daughter, Beverly Kelly, Spielplatz’s current manager. The place has been a naturist park the entire time. Iseult’s autobiography, No Shadows Fall: The Story of Spielplatz, provides a very personal account of the park’s history. Iseult was born into nudism in 1932 and remained an enthusiast her whole life.

    Spielplatz means “play place” in German, and there are many children’s playgrounds so named in Germany. Macaskie intended it to refer to somewhere people could live and enjoy recreation while completely naked. (Related articles here, here, here, here, here, here, here)

  3. A naked history of 100 years of naturism (3/25/22)

    Despite its longevity, Spielplatz wasn’t the first nudist park in England. According to this history, that honor belongs to a club called Sunbeam, founded 5 years earlier in 1924. It was located near the town of Wickford, about 35 miles east of London. The “English Gymnosophical Society”, organized in 1922, needed a place for their members to enjoy naturism without fear of legal hassles. Although this was more than two decades after naturism appeared in Germany, Brits were more reticent than less inhibited Teutons. But then, even in France, naturism didn’t gain much interest until the latter half of the 1920s. (France then had stricter laws against public nudity than Germany, and in fact still does.)

    “Gymnosophy” was a more “polite” term for nudism – although it was based on the ancient Greek “γυμνός”, which simply meant naked. The initial name of the new club was the “Moonella Group”, supposedly a name associated with the owner of the land where the club met. Sunbeam soon replaced the earlier name to avoid inane puns. Much of the club’s history is unclear, but here’s a very good article based on later research. Apparently, the original location of the club was in use for only two years. Outside of Germany, it seems naturism didn’t really get much traction until after 1930 – when it got started even in the U.S. (by Kurt Barthel and other German expatriates).

  4. Nudist Friends: Why you should want them, and why you should be them. (2/13/22)

    If you often enjoy being naked, at least when it’s possible, then before long you’ll probably want to be naked not just when you’re alone. Maybe that’s possible even when certain others are around – hopefully with some family members, or at least a significant other. But also, you may have friends who don’t seem to mind seeing you naked. Even then, you may be unsure they’re actually comfortable with your nudity, but simply being tolerant. The best case, of course, would be having friends who also enjoy being naked. So that’s an obvious reason to want friends like that, even if they don’t actually consider themselves naturists.

    With naturist friends, you can enjoy naked activities like camping, hiking, sports, parties, or just watching movies together. But will only one or two naturist friends be enough? They may not always be available when you want to go skinny-dipping, or perhaps none live close enough to visit with often. In general, the more naturist friends you have the better.

    The good news is that every naturist friend you have, even if it’s only one or two, can help you find others. Your naturist friends probably know other naturists you’ve never met – so they can introduce you. Even if they don’t know other naturists you haven’t met they may have friends or relatives who aren’t naturists but know one or more other naturists. I’ve written in detail about how this works. Here’s a shorter article with good suggestions. And here’s another article of mine on the same subject.

  5. 10 Ways Naturism Is a Healthy Lifestyle (2/4/22)

    When you’re discussing naturism with others who don’t quite understand what you like so much about being naked, it’s handy to have a few plausible reasons to offer. Out of this list of 10 reasons, these are two of the best.

    • Feeling comfortable in your own skin
      There’s more to it than simply feeling comfortable wearing nothing. It not only feels good, but there are measurable psychological benefits. Keon West of Goldsmiths’ College, University of London conducted experiments with groups of strangers who volunteered to be naked together. He found that “people who regularly participated in group nudist activities were more satisfied with their lives and content with their bodies, but he also found that such overall satisfaction was increased the more frequently these activities occurred! It seems the more often people strip down together, the more comfortable they feel with themselves.” I’ve noted more about that here.

    • That Feeling of Becoming One with Nature
      The point is that “there’s no better way to re-establish a strong connection to the natural world than through nudist recreation. It’s a beautiful sensation to have the warm sun and a light breeze accentuate your nudity as you traipse along a backwoods trail or open stretch of beach.” Here’s a video where New Zealand naturists talk about he idea.

  6. Toasted buns: A first-timer on why you should go naked this summer (1/12/22)

    People who haven’t tried naturism or even considered it generally enjoy the pleasure of nudity, at least when alone. As one New Zealander thinking about naturism remarked, “I like being naked. Who doesn’t? … there’s an innate sense of freedom and joy that comes with being starkers.” But actually going naked when strangers can see you is almost always scary – even if the others are naturists and used to nudity. But people who haven’t been raised in a naturist family have probably been taught that exposing too much to others just isn’t OK.

    A young New Zealander relates how she and a friend decided to be brave and try going naked on a local clothing-optional beach. Having a friend along helps with needed self-confidence, even if the friend doesn’t get naked. The result: both became comfortable being naked fairly soon. Although not all nude beaches (or other naturist environments) are devoid of people who don’t know proper naturist behavior, the best way to find out is to visit them. If the atmosphere doesn’t seem right, then just leave without getting naked. If all seems OK after surveying the situation, the best advice is just “Try it, you’ll like it!”

  7. Women in Nudism: Are You Hesitant? (3/25/22)

    After a few years of the Me-too movement, women are generally more hesitant about getting into naturism than at any other time in the past half-century. And they certainly have good reasons for that. Even aside from Me-too, the writer of this article, Kelly, explains, “As a woman, being nude in general used to be hard for me considering all the hang-ups I used to have over my body.” But even after getting beyond that, “Once I started to get comfortable in my own skin, I was still on the fence about nudity out in public.” Kelly also cites “A layer of insecurity that was built upon years of ingesting all forms of media with women who had perfectly curated bodies – all the things in all the right places and no flaw in sight.”

    However, after dealing with all that, gathering together enough courage and actually visiting a naturist location like a nude beach, the result is: “That first time, and every time since then, when I get nude at the beach, the world doesn’t stop. The people around me just carry on with their lives, you’re just another nude body amongst a sea of people embracing themselves – flaws and all. People of all shapes and sizes boldly deciding to not be a prisoner to cultural programming that makes nudity out to be a sin, hyper-sexual, or something only reserved for people with movie screen bodies.”

    Kelly then offers several pieces of advice that include: (1) Experience being naked at home; (2) Invite an open-minded friend to accompany you in a nude experience; (3) Proceed slowly, one step at a time; (4) Get to know experienced naturists for support and advice.

  8. How a Visit to Nude Hot Springs Helped Me Confront My Fear of Aging (2/1/22)

    People beyond middle age can have significantly different feelings about being naked around others. Many in that category have mostly stopped giving a damn about fears of social nudity. If there’s a suitable opportunity and desire to be naked, they “just do it”. But for others – women especially – the fears can be turned way up. Few in the upper age group still have bodies much like they had in their 20s. While many simply don’t care how others see them, many others do care – a lot.

    The writer, Ashley, visited a popular California hot springs with a friend who “felt a radical transformation in herself and her comfort within her own body” after a relatively early experience with social nudity. The friend explained: “It’s like anything—the more you do it, the easier it gets… Especially as women, we can feel guarded, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve also realized this body won’t be around forever. Why not enjoy it while it’s still there?”

    Initially, Ashley (although still relatively young) feared going beyond simply topfree. But later she encountered a group of older women, mostly in their late 60s, who were “sprawled out on the concrete, completely nude, sharing blankets and a picnic lunch of fruit and sandwiches.” On returning to her friend, she removed her bikini bottom and tossed it aside. She “didn’t even check to see if anyone had noticed.”

  9. Interview With A Single, Male, Introvert, First-Time Nudist! (1/18/22)

    Scott had considered himself a “part-time home nudist” since he was in middle school (so probably a pre-teen). Yet he never attempted to visit a nudist resort until 30 years later. He was single at that point and also considered himself an introvert. He was also aware that, at least until fairly recently, many clubs didn’t welcome single males – especially in many parts of the U.S. Those factors almost certainly accounted for waiting so long to seek involvement in organized naturism. Most men like Scott probably are quite hesitant for the same reasons. Consequently, a large proportion of men who enjoy nonsexual nudity either never participate in organized naturism or at best delay doing so for decades.

    After coming across an AANR article urging clubs to be more welcoming towards people like himself, Scott agreed to be interviewed about his experience. He offered suggestions for specific things clubs should do to be more welcoming – basically the same simple policies any business or organization should follow to make prospective “customers” feel comfortable and appreciated.

    Additionally, he suggested that introverts “should be willing to take some initiative and step outside their comfort zone”. (That should apply to women as well as men.) Participating in naturist activities of any sort – nude beaches, hot springs, life modeling, naturist Meetup groups, naked yoga classes, online naturist events, etc. – provides conversational material when getting to know other naturists. That’s an important step to help reduce anxieties about socializing with naturists. Becoming familiar with the policies and available activities at a particular club before visiting would make embarrassing missteps less likely.

  10. How Rejection Turned Into A Family (2/1/22)

    Here’s an even more egregious case of a naturist club turning away prospective members – a typical married couple in this case – for no apparent reason. David and Kassie “were confused and crushed. How could they reject us? We had been perfect nudists, always had been. We abided by all the AANR ethics in a social nudity scenario or situation. We knew how to act. We loved being nude. We loved nudists.” They lived in the Jacksonville, Florida area but don’t identify the rejecting club. Quite possibly the club was a smaller one where most members knew each other well, and their action strongly resembles the behavior of cliquish high school “cool kids”. That shouldn’t happen in the naturist world, but of course it does.

    The AANR article mentioned in the previous item clearly discourages that sort of thing. The couple should have complained to AANR, even if they weren’t actually AANR members. But perhaps the offending club wasn’t even an AANR affiliate. There’s a happy ending to the story though. They had no trouble visiting other clubs in their area, including the Suwannee Valley Resort, which claims to be “North Florida’s Premier Clothing Optional Resort”.

    The couple decided they “needed a club that was inclusive, whether you are straight or gay or bisexual or lesbian, married, single, or married and solo, without regard to race or religion.” So they started the First Coast Naturists, a Meetup.com based non-landed club. It was founded in 2013. and became an AANR-charted club in 2015. This is a great success story. However, Florida teems with naturists, and starting a naturist club in many parts of the U.S. that lack the climate and population density of Florida can be a much more difficult task.

Bonus from earlier:



The Rise and Fall of a Nudist Colony that Scandalized L.A. in the 1930s (9/15/17)

Very recently I summarized an article about the demise in 2000 of a once-popular naturist club, Elysium Fields, in southern California. It was just one of four naturist places in the area that had folded since 1995. Another one of those was the similarly-named Elysian Fields (usually called Elysia). Its story is recounted in the present article.

Elysia was about 40 miles from Los Angeles’ outskirts and nine miles west of Lake Elsinore. The permanent location of the 139-acre camp actually straddled the border between Orange and Riverside counties. At the time both were ultra-conservative areas, and still are to some extent. The location was chosen in the hope of avoiding law enforcement from either county (as long as both didn’t come simultaneously).

The original owners were Hobart Glassey, a nudist who’d moved to California from New Jersey (where other very early naturist places were located), and Irish-born Peter McConville. Their partnership foundered in 1935, after only two years. McConville remained in control and renamed the camp Olympic Fields. In 1954 Wally and Flo Nilson, frequent visitors to the camp, bought it from McConville, who was in poor health, and named the place in his honor.

Unfortunately, according to the article, “the era of nudism as a radical statement and the camp’s lack of amenities, including electricity, caused membership to decline. In 2000, Flo renamed the camp Mystic Oaks, and changed the camp from strictly nude to nude optional. However, membership continued to sink.” The camp closed in 2007, not long after two other troubled naturist places in southern California also succumbed (and it was followed in 2008 by Swallows Sun Island).

Newsworthy Nudity, 2021-4

  1. These 6 People Posed Nude To Celebrate Their Bodies After A Strange And Terrible Year (1/15/21)

    Body acceptance is an important factor in becoming involved with naturism to begin with, but also a primary benefit of continued participation in naturist activities. Unsurprisingly, both men and women who might otherwise enjoy social nudity are reluctant to take the first step in that direction – because they’re afraid their body isn’t “good enough”. If one is actually brave enough to visit a naturist club or resort, that people with a wide range of body types are active and enthusiastic naturists is quite obvious.

    The present article makes little connection between body acceptance and naturism. However, the 6 individuals featured in the article did allow their fully nude photos to be published and clearly expressed their varied perspectives. The most common body insecurity problem probably has to do with weight. But there are a number of other issues. One of those, especially relevant for women, has to do with body hair. There’s a social convention that body hair on a woman (other than on her head) is a problem. But Emma felt differently, observing that “the more authentic I am, the better it is for me”. And further, “I wanted to just be able to be me and focus on my personality.” That’s a healthy attitude, which is certainly relevant for most naturists.

  2. ‘Reclaiming women’s bodies from shame’: a photographic illumination of ageing (3/7/21)

    The second article deals with the same body acceptance issues, but from an additional angle – that of attitudes towards aging naked bodies. Although the focus of the article is on older women, the problem is also relevant to older men. For most people who’re fortunate to reach the age of 50 or 60 in good health, their bodies simply don’t closely resemble the bodies of 20-year-olds. And the resemblance continues to decrease in letter decades. Although most societies value the wisdom of older people (at least relative to younger ones), with respect to appearance the value is clearly on youthfulness.

    According to the article, during one year, Australian photographer Ponch Hawkes (a 75-year-old woman) “has shot more than 400 nude women over 50 to fix a pervasive problem.” The problem: “We don’t know what the bodies of older women actually look like.” It’s especially a problem in the eyes of many younger people who might be interested in naturism, since (at least in the U.S.) so many active naturists who visit naturist parks – men as well as women – have passed the 50-year mark. So the issue of physical appearance extends to age as well as weight and other factors. Perhaps surprisingly, enough older Australian women of all body types volunteered to be photographed fully nude – considerably more than one per day. Although “Some women came prepared to be naked… Others hadn’t taken their clothes off in front of anyone for years.”

  3. Lizzo shares unedited naked photo on Instagram to ‘change the conversation about beauty standards’ (4/22/21)

    According to her website, “Melissa Viviane Jefferson, known professionally as Lizzo, is an American singer, rapper, and flutist.” The article here reports that “Lizzo has been on a quest to normalise different body shapes and sizes and smash beauty standards.” As part of that, she “shared an unedited naked photo of herself, curves and all, with the goal of ‘changing the conversation about beauty standards’.” The photo, on Instagram, has received more than 2 million likes. (Of course, it’s posed so as not to violate Instagram’s absurdly prudish “standards” related to nudity.)

  4. How Being A Nudist Affected My Mental Health (3/31/21)

    Naturism benefits a person’s health in various ways – especially physical, mental, and social health. The physical benefits have been emphasized since the earliest days of naturism – fresh air, sunshine, exercise, etc. The social benefits accrue from pleasant interactions with other naturists. As described above, mental health benefits from improved body acceptance. There are scientific findings that support this.

    In the present article, Alexis makes a different yet simple case for naturism’s mental health benefits. If (and only if) you really enjoy being naked, as most naturists do, then your mental state will improve while you’re naked simply because you’re doing something pleasurable. And there’s no reason to feel any guilt about that. In the rest of the article, Alexis offers ideas for increasing the amount of time you can spend naked. (Disclaimer: Alexis included a couple of positive links to posts on this blog. Thanks, Alexis.)

  5. The new rise of naturism: Why we’re better off in the buff (4/30/21)

    Marie Claire Dorking summarizes a variety of reasons for how life can be better without clothes, especially given the lockdowns during the Covid-19 pandemic. Although there were problems with having to work from home, the upside was the freedom to dress more comfortably – or not at all. Many people probably as a result came to recognize and appreciate the pleasures of everyday life sans clothing. She explicitly notes the physical and mental health benefits of nudity. Quite simply, being naked to do routine things like cooking, cleaning, and even office work is enjoyable.

    Briitish naturist Beatrice Berry is quoted explaining how the freedom to be naked compensated for loss of other freedoms during the lockdowns. Another British naturist, Stephanie McManus, founded Body Freedom International during the pandemic to focus “on the discovery of nudity as an internal transformation tool for body acceptance, freedom, and confidence.” The article concludes with advice on getting started with naturism. It’s a good article to share with others who wonder why you like being naked.

  6. Naturist couple say stripping off outside is ‘best antidote’ to pandemic anxiety (1/14/21)

    Covid-19 is still around. Currently, in December 2022, an average of 50,000+ new cases are diagnosed per day in the U.S. – and rising. So even though the lockdowns are over and pandemic-related stress is down compared to earlier, there are new sources of anxiety and stress instead, such as high inflation, growing levels of common flu, and the onset of winter. The article here reports how pandemic stress could be relieved by getting naked outside. Although that antidote to stress is difficult at this time of year (in the Northern hemisphere), indoor nudity is still helpful – if the heating costs are affordable.

    The article reports how a long-time British naturist, Chris, overcame stress and anxiety late in 2020 by stripping off in the local woods, despite the chilly ambiance. Chris was accompanied by his partner, Ginny, but though she’d become a naturist more recently, she kept her clothes on. However, she explained, “It was so nice to see him enjoying himself again, after he’d had a couple of panic attacks.” Ginny, a photographer, was carrying her camera and documented Chris’ experience.

  7. ‘Naturism isn’t just for older, kooky people’: Lockdown has seen younger people relax their attitude to nudity (4/30/21)

    Here’s one more article on British naturism in the midst of the pandemic. The British Naturism organization made a concerted effort during the lockdown to provide remote activities for naturists in the UK (and elsewhere). Activities included a cooking show, naked yoga, a naked book club, and more. The effort was well-received, as shown by a sharp increase in BN membership. (U.S. naturist organizations generally did little extra in this period.) Many others probably took advantage of being confined at home by simply not bothering to wear anything. So they discovered and got used to the comfort of nonsexual nudity – and became interested in naturist activities.

    Since many people confined at home were quite far from retirement age, lots of young adults became adherents of naturism. And since they could be naked at home as much as they wanted, there was no impact on their careers. One of them is quoted, saying “There are many more of us younger generation naturists out there than is outwardly obvious.” The WFH (work-from-home) trend should be a boon for naturism.

  8. How Canada’s oldest nudist club helped this filmmaker understand his family history (4/28/21)

    Daniel Berish is a Vancouver, BC filmmaker. Going through old photographs with his grandmother Zella one day, they found a photo of Zella clearly wearing nothing but a towel and bathing cap. She explained unabashedly, “Oh, that’s the nudist club where I met your grandfather.” Years later, after Zella died, Daniel finally decided to learn more about his grandparents’ naturism and why it appealed to them. So, as a filmmaker, he went with a colleague to make a documentary.

    They visited the VanTan Club, which was founded in 1939 and is Canada’s oldest naturist club. He got more than just a better understanding of naturism and its appeal. According to the article, “As Berish and his colleague interviewed the folks at Van Tan, they realized that to truly understand the naturalist [sic] perspective, they would have to take it to the next level.” In Berish’s own words, “We’re excited to be able to share their story, and we knew that in order to do that, we were going to have to, you know, get naked as well… I reluctantly decided to jump in. And once I did, it was great.”

  9. 10 Tips for World Naked Gardening Day (4/1/21)

    World Naked Gardening Day was cofounded in 2005 by Mark Storey and Jacob Gabriel. (Storey is presently a consulting editor and principal writer for the Nude & Naturial magazine of TNSF.) Since then it has spread around the world to counties where naturism has enough followers. It’s not an organized activity, for the most part, but is promoted by many local naturist organizations. In the Northern hemisphere it’s usually scheduled for the first Saturday in May. (Usually in October in the Southen hemisphere.)

    In this article, Linda Weber (an activist in several naturist organizations) provides 10 pieces of practical advice, which are mainly intended for naturists who have little personal experience with gardening – but who’d like to add a new hobby they can enjoy naked.

  10. World Naked Gardening Day: Women explain why they like to garden in the buff (4/30/21)

    This is the sort of mediocre article to be expected of a British tabloid. However, it’s noteworthy that two women – Claire and Kendall – were willing to discuss the subject naked on a TV broadcast. Claire, a survivor of breast cancer with a mastectomy, said the experience strengthened her determination “to embrace her body”, and that gardening nude “gave her confidence”. She added that “I’ve always enjoyed getting my kit off and when the sun shines I love to be outside naked doing my garden.”

    Kendal admitted that “she also loves to be in the buff among her plants, but can’t always embrace her hobby fully” due to inadequate privacy from neighbors. She insisted, however, that naked gardening helped “connecting with myself and integrated my body and myself with nature.” During the episode, “the two women looked perfectly comfortable in their own skin.”

Bonus from earlier:

Is Naturism the solution to low body confidence? (1/27/20)

Just before the first waves of Covid-19 crashed on British shores, final-year journalist student Stephanie Silom went to a 60s-themed event at a hotel in Bournemouth, UK, hosted by British Naturism. According to her article, she “discovered that Naturism may be the answer to the age old problem of how we can improve our body confidence.” (Why don’t U.S. naturist organizations do this sort of event at regular hotels with quality accommodations? Never mind. What was I thinking?) Much of the article quotes BN spokespersons.

However, Stephanie concludes:

Naturism gives people the opportunity to see a huge variety of healthy body types in a safe, respectful, asexual environment. Millions of people have been converted to the Naturist lifestyle after discovering the joys of feeling fresh air on their bare skin, feeling more relaxed and less self-conscious as a result.

Naturism opens people’s eyes to the reality and beauty of the human body; our body confidence and the extent to which we base our self-worth on our bodies improves massively once we learn that almost no-one has a ‘perfect’ body.

Newsworthy nudity, 2021-3

  1. Grace saddles up for a Lady Godiva style trip through Ludlow for charity (1/26/21)

    Lady Godiva earned a place in history vastly more prominent than that of her husband Leofric, an 11th-century Earl of Mercia in central England. As the story is usually told, Godiva felt compassion for the people of Coventry suffering from her spouse’s exorbitant taxation. Her pleas to him to reduce that burden were without avail, but he agreed to some reduction provided she would ride a horse completely naked through town. If the story’s accurate, he probably was astonished when she took him up on the offer.

    In recent times, nudity has often been used to dramatize protests of many things. But Grace Oakley was determined to follow Godiva’s example, although for a constructive purpose rather than a protest – support for a charity dedicated to prevention of young suicides. (When Grace was only 12 her mother took her own life.) It was 8 months later that Grace finally made her (partially) naked ride through Ludlow (about 60 miles from Godiva’s Coventry). However, by that time she’d raised almost £3000 for her chosen charity. But the effort was probably responsible for donations from many others (who didn’t even need to go naked).

    Other accounts of Oakley’s ride:

  2. Actor strips at ‘French Oscars’ in protest at closure of theatres and cinemas (3/13/21)

    Grace Oakley used public nudity to call attention to a serious social problem, but another example of public naked protest appeared in France months before Grace’s ride. It was a protest against perceived injustice, and it was televised live for the entire country to watch. (Godiva’s protest wasn’t televised, of course.) The broadcast was part of France’s César film awards (equivalent to U.S. “Oscars”). The broadcast host had opened the event with a passionate speech against the closure of French theaters on account of the pandemic, which had already been in progress for over a year.

    French actor Corinne Masiero was to present the award for best costume (appropriately, as it turned out). Masiero wore a costume when she appeared on stage, but promptly removed it and everything else – even her shoes. It’s unclear whether or not the event organizers knew in advance that Masiero would completely divest herself, but she carried out her presentation fully naked on live television without any interruption or censorship – and the audience applauded. No news media treated the scene as scandalous. C’est la France après tout. Whether pandemic precautions were an appropriate target of protest is debatable. But the point was made quite conspicuously.

    Another reaction to the event: Nudity in French Culture – Will it change? (3/13/21)

  3. I couldn’t wait to tell my friends ! (3/25/21)

    Sheryn recounts what happened after she and her husband first visited a naturist club. The “experiment” turned out very well. “It was a bit scary at first. But we had done it and we were hooked.” Unlike most people new to naturism, she could hardly wait to tell her friends about it. The first friend reacted very positively and wanted to try it herself. The second friend was more negative and was sure she wasn’t interested. Yet a year later she’d changed her mind and went with Sheryn for a club visit – and a week later joined the club.

    Of course, Sheryn and her husband live in Britain, where people in general are much more open-minded about naturism than in the U.S. In fact, naturism has become increasingly popular in Britain over the past couple of decades, in contrast to the U.S. where the opposite has happened. (There are several stories about that in this post.) This account illustrates how not being secretive about naturism can have definite rewards – being able to share social nudity with friends, for example. Now when friends visit Sheryn’s home, her husband remains naked. Her friends are used to it and have no complaints.

  4. Naked with Friends (Part 1) (3/8/21)

    Rae was born and raised in the U.S. but moved to Vancouver, British Columbia a few years ago. She and her husband Jay are enthusiastic naturists and often visit Wreck Beach, the local clothing-optional beach and also an inland hot springs. The article’s title reveals that this article and a second part are also about sharing nudity with friends. As is usual, this sharing happens gradually. At first there are isolated and somewhat tentative experiences. But gradually, an increasing number of friends become involved and often thereafter enjoy nudity together. Anyone who enjoys nudity solely at home is missing the pleasure of genuine social naturist nudity.

  5. Fancy getting nude in a cinema full of strangers? Now you can – just BYO towel (4/20/21)

    Unlike in France, at nearly the same point in the pandemic, Australian theaters were not closed. However, in two theaters under the same ownership, in Sydney and Melbourne, it was the audience that could strip naked (if they wanted to). The movie was a Belgian tragi-comedy, Patrick, set in a nudist park – will full nudity often on screen. (Sadly, the film has received very little attention, and doesn’t seem to be available even on DVD, although it isn’t intended as an exploitation of nudity.) The showings were arranged by Hudson Sowada, director of the 2021 Fantastic Film Festival Australia. In fact, Sowada announced, “I’ll introduce the film in Melbourne in my birthday suit.” Here’s a short account of the movie with links to some reviews.

  6. New TV series shows adults stripping naked in front of kids ‘to boost body confidence’ (3/11/21)

    Also on the subject of television nudity, in March 2021 a Dutch TV show (“Simply Naked”) debuted. It’s based on a very similar Danish show “Ultra Strips Down” that debuted 2 years previously. In an image from the new show, “five grown-ups are seen disrobing in front of children and standing in front of them completely naked,” according to a British tabloid. However, the show had no prurient intent. Rather, it was intended to teach kids about body confidence. The show’s host described the series’ purpose as “to help children understand different body shapes.”

    True to customary British tabloid form, the screen image of the disrobing was heavily censored, so as not to disturb prudish, dirty-minded British readers. But youngsters in Holland had no such unease. According to the article, “The kids are shown getting the giggles as the adults strip off.” Probably most of them had seen it all before at home. Even most Brit adults have probably seen it all themselves.

  7. Is There A Nude Campground In Quartzsite? (2/8/21)

    Yes, there definitely is. For some time it’s been known as the Magic Circle, so-named on account of a circular maze constructed of rocks by naturist RVers in one part of a U.S Bureau of Land Management (BLM) camping area near Quartzite, AZ. Unlike National Parks, the BLM has no rules against nudity on most of its land, although local laws may take precedence.

    On most BLM land, campers may stay no longer than 2 weeks. At Magic Circle, however, the limit is 7 months, and many campers stay much of that time, in part because many of them are retired and enjoy the area’s warmth for a large part of the year. So the average age of campers tends to be on the high side. Since so many Magic Circle campers stay for extended periods, they get to know each other. The result is that the place has the vibe of a regular naturist club, including planned social events. Note that there are some general rules. For instance, relocating every 2 weeks is required during the summer. And there are fees: $40 for 2 weeks, or $180 for 7 months.

  8. Doing the Naked Macarena (2/16/21)

    Katrina provides a capsule account of the best things about naturism, all in the process of describing her first experience on a nude cruise in the Caribbean. She and her husband had their first naturist experience at a Caribbean resort a year before the cruise. They were quite uncomfortable with nudity the first day. But by the third day they found total nudity to be completely… natural. Naked bodies are just bodies, and they exist in all shapes and sizes. Just read the story for an idea of what a nude cruise is like. And what about the macarena? Well, that’s just an energetic dance best done naked to allow maximal freedom of movement for all body parts.

    The cruise itself is offered every year by a company called Bare Necessities. You can be naked as much as you want while at sea. But it’s not cheap – for 2 people in a cabin the cost can exceed $20,000, depending on location in the ship. (Singles can share a cabin – and expenses – with another single if desired.) And although the boat hosts 3500 people, a reservation far in advance is a good idea if you want a specific room category. There’s also a Greek isles cruise on a smaller ship if you want a Mediterranean experience.

  9. The UK’s best nudist beaches for families and couples (2/28/21)

    Although the British climate is not exactly ideal for naturism, the UK nevertheless has plenty of coastline – and nudity is possible at many locations. But which ones are “safe” for families with children? Unless a kid has been instructed from an early age that wearing clothes is absolutely necessary, they shouldn’t have a problem with nudity. As the writer notes, “Naturism seems to come naturally to the kids.”

    Still, it makes good sense to choose a beach where nudity is possible but also somewhere that worrying about improper behavior of others is unnecessary. Since youngsters can’t resist an opportunity to swim and jump in the waves, choosing a place with surf that’s not too rough is important. And if no suitable beaches are near the family home, a location should have good dining choices and overnight accommodations. This article suggests 6 good options for families, as well as 3 others more suitable for adults.

  10. A Global Guide to Nude & Topless Sunbathing (3/31/21)

    Here’s a different sort of guide to clothing-optional beaches and topfree sunbathing places. It doesn’t list specific locations. Instead, it provides a general rating of tolerance for skinny-dipping and topfreedom. The guide covers most countries in the world, although its ratings can be vague and uncertain sometimes. The ratings have four color-coded categories:

    • Green: many “official” public locations where nudity is OK
    • Yellow: public nudity is usually unacceptable, but tolerated in specific locations
    • Red: public nudity not acceptable – don’t go there to be naked
    • Grey: insufficient relevant information


    There are color-coded maps of the whole world, including a separate map with individual state details just for the U.S. All countries have individual listings, usually with more details. Only public locations are considered, but the existence of private naturist clubs and resorts may be noted. Some indications of the survey’s methodology and information are provided. The survey was conducted by a British female lingerie/swimwear company (cognitive-dissonance alert) named Pour Moi. The information is provided as of July 2021, and (of course) may be different at a later time.

    Other places where the survey is presented in less complete form:

Bonus from earlier: I spent a week at home in the nude, and this is what I learned about my body (4/3/17)

Cat (her preferred name), from New Zealand, reports “When I read that naturists have higher self-esteem than those who keep their clothes on, I decided to spend a week in the nude in the privacy of my own home to see what I could learn. I hoped that my naked experiment would make me more comfortable with my body and its imperfections.” And so: “I worked, slept, cooked, cleaned, and got on with family life minus my clothes. Although I was a little apprehensive about my nudity project, on the whole I really enjoyed it.”

There were some uncomfortable factors initially. However, “On other days, though, my nudity was liberating and fun. There were even a few moments where I felt profoundly present in my body.” On one rainy afternoon she went into her backyard, forgetting she was nude, but she enjoyed feeling the rain on her skin. Finally, “After spending a week naked at home, the prospect of stripping off in public became less daunting.”

Do you know anyone who’s aware you’re a naturist, seems open-minded, and has the free time? If so, try suggesting they spend a weekend, several days, or a whole week naked at home the whole time – assuming anyone they live with won’t object. Suggest they’ll understand, at least, what you like about naturism. You may find another friend to enjoy naturism with.

Newsworthy nudity, 2022-1

  1. Naked Dressing Has You Covered (10/23/22)

    According to the New York Times, this is what some assertively chic women may be wearing come Spring 2023. One quoted source said, “It’s just about the body. It’s about, I have the right to expose myself the way I want to.” At least, that’s what “fashion” designers are claiming. Another source says, “the way we play with sex appeal is not trying to be body-enhancing. It’s about being in control of your identity.” Close to what naturists have been saying all along, right? There’s almost no good reason that any part of the body must be hidden.

    About this “new naked dressing” the article’s writer maintains that “exposure does not equate to vulnerability but strength and that the body just as it is is just fine.” As naturists will wholeheartedly agree. “The point of the new nakedness,” yet another source observes, “is not to provide that sort of viewing pleasure [for others] but rather a form of self-pleasure.”

    Certain women may choose to wear something that exposes just a bit short of everything. Such minimal clothing is merely decoration – like tattoos, jewelry, or other accessories that conceal little. Women at naturist places, in fact, often make a similar choice – and that’s fine. What’s the reason? It’s about “control of identity”. In many contexts, such as business and professional settings, women traditionally have much more freedom of choice than men about the colors, styles, etc. of what they wear. So selecting one of these “almost but not entirely naked” fashions to make a unique statement of who they are is understandable. (Supposedly, some women are upset if another woman present is wearing a nearly identical outfit, as that could suggest it was mass-produced in some Asian sweatshop and there’s nothing special about it.)

    But before you get carried away with thinking there might be a trend toward wearing a “bare” minimum, consider the reality. It’s a “trend” only for relatively few women. This is “fashion” or “style” in limited circumstances, such as social occasions where distinctiveness matters. You won’t see anything like this while shopping at Walmart.

  2. A Bold New Plan For A Bold New Age Of Nudism (1/14/22)

    That AANR has a “bold new plan” is great. Basically, the plan is for more effective advertising. That’s fine – as far as it goes. But it’s a top-down approach. In other words, AANR hopes to stimulate awareness of and interest in naturism through advertising. But whether that should be the main approach is debatable. Many studies of how ideas are transmitted show that person-to-person communication is much more effective than advertising. Wouldn’t you be much more likely to seriously consider an idea that someone you know and trust passed along than an advertisement you saw somewhere? An advertisement that makes claims without trustworthy information to back them up?

    An effective plan to promote naturism needs to include a bottom-up approach. That would mean encouraging people who are already enthusiastic naturists to explain what is so great about naturism to open-minded friends – along with an invitation to try it themselves with someone they respect and trust. This is a “grassroots” strategy that can be effective if millions of current naturists are encouraged to do what they can to promote naturism.

    And it’s way past time for AANR to ditch the terms “nudism” and “nudist”. They’re really outdated, as well as having risible connotations to most people. The terms “naturism” and “naturist” are what’s used in reference to social nudity in most countries other than the U.S. Disagree? Well, think about how chosen terminology affects other people, rather than what you might personally prefer.

  3. Life in the buff (9/23/22)

    This article by Annebella Pollen, a professor of visual and material culture, deals with the history of nude photography, mainly involving naturists in Britain since the 1920s. Ms. Pollen herself has published a book, Nudism in A Cold Climate on the subject. (I haven’t yet had the opportunity to check it out, but I hope to soon.) In the early days, photography of naturists in the flesh – often female and as explicit as could be allowed – was intended to promote naturism in a healthy way. Perhaps inevitably, such photography became used as soft porn by non-naturists decades before explicit nude photos (pornish or otherwise) could legally be sold.

    Simply as an overview of early naturism in Britain, apart from photography, there are a few interesting details. One is the point that early naturism in Britain (as well as Germany and France) was meant to be a lifestyle that promoted healthy living, physical fitness, and the body type that would result. For better or worse, naturists now emphasize that “all bodies are good bodies”. Another interesting detail is that “By the end of the 1930s, nudist membership was at an all-time high in Britain, with around 40,000 members.” That compares very favorably with the peak membership of AANR in the U.S. in 2000 – around 65,000 – even though Britain’s population in 1940 was about 13% of the U.S. population in 2000.

  4. Bare with us: why naturism in Britain is booming (8/7/22)

    Fast forward from British naturism in 1940 to the present day. The article here is from The Guardian, by far Britains’s most respectable news source, rather than from the official British Naturism organization. It’s likely accurate (as a survey reported in the next article indicates). A reason for the assertion is probably in the initial blurb: “One of the unexpected results of the pandemic has been the rise of nudism – so much so that British Naturism is experiencing the fastest growth in new members in 100 years” (roughly the entire history of naturism in the UK). But that, by itself, is hardly the only reason. A very important factor is that – unlike either U.S. naturist organization – BN has long provided enjoyable naturist activities directly to its members. And that’s in spite of the fact that the British climate is notably less benign than in (at least) the more southerly parts of the U.S.

    Especially during the pandemic, BN offered its members a number of activities via Zoom – yoga and exercise sessions, online group chats, cooking lessons, etc. But before the pandemic, and now that it’s mostly abated, BN has offered a wide range of both online and in-person activities. The continuing online choices include discussion forums, blogs, book groups, and member picture galleries. The in-person activities are numerous too – organized swim sessions at local pools, regional festivals and gatherings, and events to support charities, including Great British Skinny Dips at many beaches. Neither U.S. national naturist organization offers any comparable smorgasbord of naturist activities. Even AANR’s “Bold New Plan” certainly involves nothing at all similar.

  5. 6.75 million Naturists in the UK (10/15/22)

    The evidence, alluded to just above, for how naturism is “booming” in Britain is from a poll that BN recently commissioned from the Ipsos public opinion firm. The result: “14% (equating to 6.75 million adults) of people in the UK describe themselves as Naturists or Nudists”. That compares to a similar 2011 poll that gave a result of 3.7 million adults (6%) – which was still pretty good. That’s nearly a double in 11 years. 14% of the current U.S. adult population is about 29 million. There’s no way that many U.S. people would describe themselves as naturists or nudists. Or even participate in naturist activities, regardless of how they describe themselves. If that total were even in the same ballpark, U.S. naturist clubs and resorts would be doing a “booming” business, with an average of something like 100,000 different visitors each year.

    Some other findings of the recent British poll:

    • 21% of respondents say they’ve skinny-dipped at some time in their life.
    • 39% of adults have participated in some type of nude recreation, like skinny dipping, sunbathing, or visiting a naturist beach.
    • 22% of respondents have been naked in the presence of others (including by video) at least once in the past year.
    • 47% of young people (age from 16 to 44) have participated in a naturist activity at least once in the past year, compared to just 6% of respondents in the 45-75 age range.


    U.S. naturists should be so jealous.

  6. Nearly 7m people in UK identify as naturists or nudists, survey suggests (10/15/22)

    The Guardian considered the results of the BN poll to be sufficiently newsworthy to report in a prominent article. In fact, a similar poll was done in 2001, with only 2% ot the population identifying as naturists. So the percentage tripled in 10 years! The increase almost certainly isn’t an error or due simply to faulty polling. In contrast, between 2001 and now AANR’s membership has dropped by more than half. It’s pretty clear which of BN or AANR is the more effective organization. BN modestly suggests that the result for naturism in Britain is because “more people are discovering the benefits that nudity brings to mental, emotional and physical health”. But it’s likely most of those people didn’t discover it by themselves without any help from an active naturist organization providing opportunities to experience social nudity in person.

    The article placed some emphasis on how many young people in Britain have taken to naturism – so that almost half of newly active naturists in the UK were in the youngest category: 16 to 24 years of age, compared to only 6% in the 45-75 year range. (All the rest were 25 to 44.) The survey from 10 years ago found nearly an even split between the oldest and youngest groups of new naturists. Whatever the reason, BN seems to have found a way to appeal to people who may remain naturists for at least another half-century. To drive home the point, a new naturist, Katy, who’s 17, was quoted saying “A group of us went swimming in the lakes over the summer and decided on the spur of the moment, to take off our costumes. Then we just hung out afterwards, not bothering to get dressed. I realised it was so freeing.”

  7. HALF of young British adults identify as naturists or nudists: Poll reveals surge in 16 to 24-year-olds enjoying activities without wearing clothes (10/15/22)

    Here’s a little more about the young British naturists between 16 and 24 years of age. It’s from The Daily Mail, one of many British tabloids. As such, it’s certainly no peer of The Guardian. In particular, the headline mistakenly states that half of all young Brits in that age group are naturists. In fact, as noted above, what’s actually correct is that half of new naturists are in that age group. Still, as BN President Dr Mark Bass said, “Younger people are diving into it far more than their elders have done. That gives us a lot of confidence in the future.”

    Despite the editorial blunder, the British reality should be very interesting for U.S. naturists, as (unfortunately) in the U.S. rather few young adults participate in naturism. Apparently, they think it’s somehow “uncool” and only for people middle-aged or older. Young British naturists thoroughly debunk that idea. It seems to be true that people who “belong” to a particular generation (“Gen Z” in this case) mostly pay attention only to what their generational peers think. That’s a good thing for naturists in Britain – but not good at all in the U.S. Precisely because of the great misconception the youngest U.S. adults avoid participation in naturism. It’s a vicious circle. C’est la vie.

  8. How naked festival Nudefest FINALLY made me feel comfortable in my own skin (7/8/22)

    Here’s a fine example of what BN does to attract new people to naturism. They don’t just put up ads promoting naturism, no matter how enticing. What’s far more persuasive is actual, positive, clothes-off experiences with naturism. People who’re at all curious about naturism need to be surrounded by naked naturists having a great time. And better still if they get naked themselves. BN’s flagship summer naturist festival is called Nudefest.

    Antonia, who works for the Daily Mail, was asked by her employer if she “fancied reporting from Nudefest”. “I said yes before I could change my mind, or think it through,” she replied. Her explanation: “Since stopping drinking to improve my health in January, I have tried to push my comfort boundaries, to prove that giving up alcohol need not make life dull.” Nevertheless, she still approached the experience with much trepidation, but determined not to flinch from a resolve to get naked from the start.

    One of the first people she speoke with explains, “Some people think we are ridiculous, dangerous even, but the truth is that everyone who gets into this environment changes their view, because it’s so normal when everyone’s naked.” Knowing how common such negative assumptions are among non-naturists, it’s reassuring to first-timers that the truth is how normal being naked with others actually feels. Unfortunately, persuading doubters about the reality is usually difficult.

    After having spoken with first-timers whose initial anxieties were like her own, Antonia reports, “The longer I’m naked for, the more normal it seems, and by the time I’m watching a naked circus performer on stage, his genitals twirling as enthusiastically as the giant hoop he’s in, I often forget I’m naked at all.” This process is exactly what’s necessary, in most cases, to persuade others that engaging in naturist activities (whether or not one starts to self-identify as a naturist) is something they need in their lives. It’s just the Confucian saying: “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.” This is why simply advertising the goodness of naturism usually doesn’t work.

  9. Naturists cast off their clothes and all their worries on the beach (8/14/22)

    Although most of the foregoing is about naturism in Britain, it’s encouraging that Britain’s next-door neighbor, Ireland, has recently begun to have enthusiastic naturists too, despite being predominantly Roman Catholic. In this article, Leticia Medina, president of the Irish Naturist Association, affirms that naturism “is not linked to sex in public. It is not voyeurism, or exhibitionism. It is about being natural in a non-judgemental environment. Nothing sexual happens here. It’s just naked people on a beach… It’s about body equality. It’s about body confidence, and creating an environment for positive aging. You feel free.”

    Just like BN, the fledgling INA “saw its numbers swell during the pandemic. As well as beach meet-ups, they embark on naked yoga, hiking and trips overseas to parts of Europe, often to visit saunas. They also rent swimming pools and saunas in Ireland for private naturist sessions.” The Irish law on nudity is just like Britain’s: “Being naked in public is not a criminal offence, unless people are “causing alarm” to other members of the public or there is a sexual threat displayed.” And, Medina notes, “We have had very little opposition from anyone”. The organization has also had private naked tours to art galleries running exhibitions displaying naked art.

  10. I Raised My Kids On A Nude Beach — And I’d Do It Again In A Heartbeat (9/14/22)

    Public opinion in the U.S. generally considers any involvement of children in naturist activities before puberty to be inherently dangerous and likely harmful to young minds, especially the youngest. They might learn things that their adults don’t want them to know! That’s crazy, of course. In this article Nadine Robinson, a Canadian naturist mother of four daughters, shares her feelings about children and nudity – emphasizing especially the value of learning in detail what real bodies are like. As a practicing midwife, when her children ranged in age from 4 to 11 she has no qualms talking with then about pubic hair, placentas, and what the clitoris is. Plainly, going to a nude beach and getting naked among many naked others wasn’t a problem at all.

    Nadine had been going to nude beaches since she “first discovered them at the age of 16, when I snuck away from my parents on a family vacation in Hawaii. I loved the freedom of being naked in the waves, and I couldn’t believe how confident I felt.” One of her reason for taking the children to a nude beach was to “help immunize them from the cultural idea that women’s bodies exist for men’s viewing pleasure.” She believes that “mainstream media gives women a dangerously narrow definition of what is beautiful. I was much more terrified that my children would internalize an unrealistic image of women’s bodies”.

    She says her “kids loved their first experience at the naked beach. They were comfortable, confident, and it really demystified nudity. Every summer after that they visited the naked beach. They’re all now adults. Each of them “has had their own relationship with nudity over the years. Sometimes they went completely naked, other times they stayed clothed, honoring their personal comfort as they moved through life stages.” If only many more mothers were like Nadine there would be far fewer women who are overly anxious about their bodies – and unable to even understand naturism and what’s so great about it.

Bonus from earlier: You Should Get Naked More Often. It’s Good for You. (7/21/16)

Newsworthy nudity, 2021-2

  1. What it’s like to be a life model and pose nude for strangers (2/12/21)

    In the previous edition of this series there was an article about how posing nude as an artist’s model can be a source of empowerment. That was from a male perspective. This article provides a female perspective. It’s noted that “Disrobing in front of a room full of other people who are intently staring at you is way out of most peoples’ comfort zone.” For experienced naturists this should be no problem at all. But it should also be considered by anyone who’s not deathly afraid of being seen naked by others, because it could enhance their self-confidence, and is often a modest source of extra income. Also, of course, it could entice people into trying naturism.

    One problem for many who may be interested in posing nude as a life model is finding a class that’s looking for models. Anywhere that art classes are offered is a possibility. That includes college and junior college art classes, places offering adult education classes, and sometimes classes at art museums. Two related articles (here and here) describe what’s involved in modeling. It’s noted that the average pay for modeling is about $25 per hour, but that probably assumes at least some modeling experience. However, for anyone who wouldn’t mind working naked, the pay could be a secondary matter.

  2. NAKED a Life Modeling Film about Life (2/20/21)
    Review of the film: Irish Film Review: Naked

    The Irish Naturist Association held a virtual event to view a documentary film and discuss it with the film’s director and his life model. The film is available to rent, but the INA provided a review (second link). There are many interesting observations, but the overall message is that “life modeling is empowering.” As one model notes, “once the threshold of fear was crossed, the idea of posing naked was no longer fraught with difficulties.” There’s a great deal for naturists to think about in these observations. In particular, being open about one’s enjoyment of naturism is also empowering. Another comment from the director recognizes a fundamental obstacle naturism faces almost everywhere: “There is a culture of silence against nudity worldwide in the mass media today, and I think it’s very unhealthy.”

  3. Get Naked Australia founder reveals the best things you can do nude from hot air ballooning to rock climbing (2/15/21)

    Get Naked Australia is an organization known to many naturists worldwide through its social media sites on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. The idea originated with Brendan Jones in 2015 and soon became quite popular with young people in Australia who travel to many natural sites in the country to enjoy nudity and be photographed naked. Judging from the photographic evidence, women are well represented in GNA activities, which are quite varied. They include small yacht cruises, rock climbing, hot air ballooning, yoga retreats, camping, and (of course) skinny dipping.

    Such things understandably appeal especially to younger people more than visits to established naturist parks and resorts. The U.S. is desperately in need of young people like Brendan to revitalize naturism in this country. Many young people resist being labeled or regarding their activities as part of a “lifestyle”, and so the idea to just “Get Naked” may have more appeal. (Here’s a similar article on GNA.)

  4. 12 Activities To Try During National Nude Recreation Week (6/18/21)

    This article continues the theme of appealing ways to get naked – other than visiting the more traditional RV parking lot with a swimming pool and clubhouse. “National Nude Recreation Week” is proclaimed (yearly, after July 4) by U.S. naturist organizations to promote naturist activities. To come up with a full list of 12, the article mentions a few rather obvious things (get an all-over tan, skinny dip in the pool) and some stereotypical naturist games involving spherical objects (volleyball, pickleball, golf). So, up to 5 already. Then there are 5k nude races. (Sounds a little strenuous, but 5K is just a bit over 3 miles.) And you can work out at the resort’s gym or practice yoga.

    But other things are possible beyond naturist ghettos. There are World Naked Bike Rides and celebrating World Naked Gardening Day (usually outside the proclaimed week). There’s always naked hiking – anywhere you probably won’t be seen by textiles. And, finally, there are nude cruises – if you can afford them and book far enough in advance. No mention, however, of life modeling or simply having a clothing-optional party for friends in your own home. All-in-all, this isn’t quite Get Naked Australia stuff.

  5. Charlie Max Thinks We Should All Be Cooking Nude (5/26/21)

    Here’s one more thing that’s best done naked. Max is a model and an “OnlyFans creator” – which means she offers NSFW content (for a price). Not having checked that out myself, I can’t say it’s strictly of the naturist sort. But Max does emphasize naturist values in this article. Cooking is certainly another natural activity that can be enjoyed totally naked (with sensible precautions about things that could burn).

    Max makes healthy living in general a priority. In particular, that means “plant-based cooking”. But she also advocates body positivity and nakedness. She argues that food should not only be prepared while nude, but also served and eaten while clothesfree. Max hosts dinner parties for friends while nude herself (with clothing presumably being optional for guests). “Finding comfort, support and acceptance in being nude around my friends allowed me to feel confident in my body,” she avers. Naturists certainly can understand and agree with that.

  6. I tried cooking in the nude (so you can too) (8/4/21, updated 4/25/22, 10/19/22).

    Hannah Cole has a positive response to Charlie Max’s article. However, body insecurities and aversion to cold somewhat limit her enthusiasm, as they also do for many naturists. She nevertheless summarizes briefly many good features of naturism. Hannah notes that “Other practising nude cooks mention they feel more creative and less restricted when crafting meals this way.” (The same could be said of many other creative activities, like writing or even software programming.) She goes on to recount her first fully nude cooking effort – especially how “Being in my house sans clothing was cleansing.” In conclusion she says she’s now “open to a more nude-inclusive lifestyle.” The takeaway here is that finding even one activity one can really enjoy naked opens the door to additional involvement in naturism.

  7. Reasons Why Everyone Should Try Skinny Dipping At Least Once (7/3/21)

    The information here is mainly about why skinny dipping is really enjoyable, but there’s a little advice about what people having no experience with skinny dipping should know. This information usually won’t be new to most naturists, unless their experience being naked is mostly in their own homes. Naturists who already know most of this – if they’re open to discussing the subject with others – may be better able to know what information about skinny dipping they should offer to friends. People with little or no naturist experience but are curious about skinny dipping should find the whole article useful.

    The article’s not long, so just read it for the details. People, of course, should already know about things like using sunscreen and what hazards may exist in specific places. Such information applies to swimming anywhere, from a private pool to a popular ocean beach. There probably should be more advice about good naturist and nude beach etiquette. But mainly the information is about why skinny dipping is such a great pleasure – although naturists can make many good points from their own experience, even if they seldom skinny dip.

  8. Going Bare (7/22/21)

    Here are some further thoughts on nudity from Yael Wolfe. She probably wouldn’t think of herself as a naturist, and isn’t advocating nudity at home as a regular practice (the way a naturist might). But she does write about the value of experiencing nudity occasionally for its own sake. “Learning how to be in my body without making judgments about how it measures up to cultural beauty standards. Without feeling dirty, obscene, and shameful.” Because “It feels like liberation. Painful liberation, but liberation all the same.” In other words, exactly what naturists often advocate as a means for body acceptance.

  9. The Sheffield duo who interview strangers completely naked – and how it’s changed their lives (2/6/21)

    Kat Harbourne and Jenny Eells are BBC journalists who in 2017 conceived the idea of doing a podcast in which they as well as guests they interviewed would be naked. The initial idea was to explore issues around body image (just as Yael does in the item just above). It’s called (of course) The Naked Podcast. Although the podcasts concluded after 67 episodes in October 2020, all the episodes are still available at the link just mentioned. It was also written about on this blog: here.

    The present article, which asks how it changed the podcasters’ lives, appeared 4 months after the last episode. Both Kat and Jenny feel that “doing the series for the past few years has helped them and their own body image.” Kat observed that “you don’t need to look or act a certain way to love your body – you don’t need to be a certain size to be happy.” So here again is a message about body acceptance. Naturists simply can’t repeat that enough.

  10. Florida Beaches Guide – Haulover Beach (7/11/21)

    Haulover Beach, just a little north of Miami Beach, is easily the most popular clothing-optional beach in the state. In part that’s because of its proximity to a large city. But it’s also thanks to the efforts over a number of years by the South Florida Free Beaches organization. Thanks to SFFB, Haulover is one of the very small number of U.S. beaches that have an official clothing-optional portion, and the organization maintains a “Beach Ambassador” program to ensure that Haulover remains a safe and enjoyable place, even for families. Tripadvisor has more information on Haulover.

Bonus from earlier: Are you a Naked Person? (3/10/11)

Alden Wicker believes, “Your comfort with nudity says a lot about who you are.” She explains further, “I’m not asking if you’re a nudist, an exhibitionist, or a Playboy model. I’m just asking if you’re comfortable in your nakedness.” In more detail, “I think your view of nakedness says more about you than how conventionally beautiful you are. … I’m not saying naked people are better; they just approach life differently.” So here’s one more affirmation that getting comfortable with ordinary nudity is a dependable facilitator of body acceptance.

Newsworthy nudity, 2021-1

Obviously, there’s been a long gap since the last “Recent articles on nudity and naturism” here, which was for January 1-15, 2021. Two reasons: the relevant newsflow does seem to have slowed down, but even so, time constraints have made it difficult to keep posting new articles on this theme twice a month. So I’ll try a different approach.

Many interesting articles have been noted since January 2021. So the best of those will be included in the new series, as well as anything suitable that comes out in the future. But there won’t be any fixed posting schedule. It will just happen as time permits, and selected items won’t necessarily appear in chronological order. Also, there will usually be less commentary on individual articles than in the past. These changes may allow new posts to appear as often as before.
Continue reading “Newsworthy nudity, 2021-1”

The strange feeling of daily life without wearing any clothes

Here are some thoughts for open-minded people in the Northern hemisphere at the beginning of summer with its (much) warmer weather – the best time of the year to go naked.

It’s likely that when you were very young – 2 or 3 years old, maybe – your parents occasionally allowed you to play around the house or in the backyard with nothing on. Or after a bath you might have been allowed to stay naked until bedtime. You almost certainly enjoyed the experience at the time. The chances are, however, that you have no clear memory of that – unless your parents thought it was cute and took pictures or videos.
Continue reading “The strange feeling of daily life without wearing any clothes”

From your clothes you have got to be leaving

Red River Valley is an old North American folk tune. I think of it often. Writing new naturist-oriented lyrics for it is amazingly easy – I just couldn’t stop myself until I had 11 full stanzas. If you feel compelled to actually sing this, just be aware that a few accents should be placed not quite where they usually are.

Will you think of the time you have wasted
Washing clothes you had rather not worn?
Will you think of how much you have hated
Wearing stuff that just left you forlorn?

Will you think of the clothes you’ll be leaving,
And how useless they really have been?
Will you think of the cash you have wasted
Buying clothes just to cover your skin?

Wearing clothes is so wrong when the sun shines.
Fully naked is what you must be.
All your body parts must stay uncovered,
So you’ll live every day happily.

Wearing nothing at all for the whole day
Is exactly the thing your soul craves,
And you so hope for the time that can be.
Let your clothing be cast to the waves.

Many think nudity must be sinful,
But that’s crazy and totally wrong.
Let’s all happily show our whole bodies,
And rejoice simply bare all day long.

Just forget wearing even a T-shirt,
And of course be all nude further down.
Every inch of your skin’s best uncovered.
It surpasses so far any gown.

Very sadly most folks can’t live unclothed.
They can’t see why they need nothing on.
Please tell others it’s fine when you’re naked,
How much better life is with clothes gone.

Do you fear that your friends might reject you
Once you’ve started to never wear clothes?
You will find that your true friends applaud you
When your butt is as bare as your toes.

My advice: give away all your clothing.
Life is great when there’s nothing to wear.
You will find that you feel so much better,
When you’re proudly and completely bare.

From your clothes you have got to be leaving.
They just never were worthwhile at all.
You have hated forever to wear them.
Fully naked you’ll stand proud and tall.

Being clothesfree is such a great lifestyle.
You must forget your fears joyously.
When your closet and yourself are all bare,
Nude for now and for good gloriously.

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, December 16-31, 2020



  1. Naturist travel and vacations

    The website TravelAwaits seems to offer good information on a popular topic: travel and vacations. One nice feature is that it deals separately with a number of different types of travel, such as weekend getaways, family vacations, cruises, RVing and camping, budget travel, and a few others. Rather unusually for a travel website for the general public, naturist travel is also one of the types covered.

    Although December is not exactly the best month for naturist travel in the northern hemisphere, there are 3 articles offered in that month:

    • 8 Best European Nude Beaches
      Lists of “best” clothing-optional beaches are common, of course. But this list is a good one. As the article says, “You’ve got to hand it to the Europeans. When it comes to vacationing, they know how to do it properly. They don’t think twice about taking off for three weeks in the summer, nor leaving their clothes behind with their laptops.” Three of the beaches are in France, which has long been a top naturist destination, as explained here. The article’s first choice is Montalivet, for good reasons. (It’s the beach pictured above.)

    • The Ultimate Naturist Vacation Packing List: Things You Must Bring And What To Leave Behind
      Frequent travelers know pretty well what they need to bring with them. But there are a few additions (and deletions) to consider for a naturist vacation. You will need just a few clothes (at least for getting to the location), as few as possible. Depending on exactly what type of vacation you’re considering – camping, nude resort, or cruise – there may be some additional things to include.

    • 6 Reasons Nude Vacations Are Becoming More Popular
      If you’re an experienced naturist you know how good being naked feels (when done in a nudity-friendly environment). And lots of fun activities are even more fun without clothes. Once you’ve discovered this, you’ll know why nude vacations are becoming more popular.


    Previous articles on that site were: 8 Top Naturist Resorts In France and Everything You Wanted To Know About Being A Naturist But Were Afraid To Ask



  2. Growing up with nudists


    If you haven’t experienced being a child in a family in which it was normal, or at least not unusual, to wear nothing, you may well be envious of anyone who’s had that good fortune. Here’s an article from someone who had that experience – in a naturist camp, no less – until he was an adult. He kept a cottage there, which he used off and on for 30 years after he left.

    Michael Ruehle writes about the 25-acre naturist camp in Canada, where he spent his childhood living with his family. The camp, Sun Valley Gardens, has been closed for the last 15 years. At its peak in the 1960s and 70s, “there were about 500 adult members, and it was one of the largest nudist clubs in North America, with members coming from as far as Toronto, Montreal, Boston, and Cleveland,” according to Michael. This was in spite of its relatively small physical size.

    The camp was started around 1956 by his father, Karl, who had immigrated from Germany. He had been inspired by naturism in his own youth and wanted to continue after moving to Canada. Unlike many naturists in the 1950s (and even up to now), Karl was not secretive about naturism. He occasionally invited neighbors, local politicians, and news media to visit. As a result, “instead of being harassed, the place was quite quickly accepted by the authorities.”

    Michael goes on to write a lot more about the camp during the time it was most successful, but he says only a little about his own childhood experiences, except to note that
    We never concealed where we lived, so it was the subject of a lot of curiosity among the other kids. But most of my friends, male or female, were permitted to come visit me — another benefit of the “open house” policy, because their parents had presumably visited. I had another large group of friends at Sun Valley Gardens as well, who would be there either on weekends or for two or three weeks at a time, and I would see them every summer.

    Related information:

    • Nudists bare all for journalist June Callwood
      An actual 13-minute video from a 1961 TV interview of Michael’s parents.

    • SLIDESHOW SPECIAL | Naturism in Niagara
      A set of 40 slides, some in restored color, of historical views of Sun Valley Gardens in the early years. (The property has not been maintained and is now decrepit, as some recent pictures show.) There’s also a long recent article on the camp’s history.

  3. Local Opportunities for Naturism

    Rye is a town in the southeast of England, about 75 miles and slightly less than 2 hours from London. It’s on the coast and has a population of about 9000. The article here appeared in the local newspaper and could easily serve as a glowing advertisement for naturism. For example, here’s how it describes the activities of the local naturist group:

    East Sussex Naturists is a loose social group of naturists who, until 2020 closed most things down, were arranging visits to local art galleries, pub meals, yoga classes, regular weekly swims at local facilities, countryside walks and cycle rides in Kent and Sussex, ten-pin bowling and more – yes, and all without wearing clothes!

    Right there you have a variety of activities whose extent far surpasses that of most local groups in the U. S. – of which there are actually rather few anyway. Why aren’t there more? Part of the answer probably is that very few local news media these days would publish such a favorable report on naturism in their area. (Obvious, very likely reason: local naturists groups these days are not media savvy, and make little, if any, effort to cultivate good relations with their community and local media, unlike what Sun Valley Gardens did way back in the 1950s.)

    So, given the poor public relations efforts of most local naturist groups in the U. S. now, why should non-naturists have a positive opinion of naturism, let alone consider participating in a naturist activity? Why would any U. S. naturist (except for maybe a few in Florida living close to a naturist resort) think – even in their wildest imagination – that local media might offer such a positive take on naturism?

    General U. S. attitudes towards naturism are still, relatively speaking, in the stone age. And, if anything, only becoming less favorable as time goes on. Local news media (such as still exist, anyhow) simply reflect cluelessness, because, in the absence of outreach from naturist groups, the media just perpetuate existing uninformed attitudes. And that only magnifies the failure of the public to understand naturism.

  4. One in 10 employees enjoy working from home in the nude


    That finding is rather surprising – but what it really means depends on the details. It’s from a survey by Kaspersky Lab, a multinational cybersecurity company – whose headquarters is in Moscow. Hmmm. Its main product is antivirus software. The company has been suspected, according to Wikipedia, of including malware in some of its software. But that’s not the issue here, whether or not the suspicion is correct.

    Why would an antivirus software company have made such a finding, or even asked about it in a survey? The answer is that, because of the pandemic, a large percentage of company employees have been working at home instead of in an office. And so those employees don’t obviously need to wear customary office attire – or anything at all, for that matter. If the finding is correct, then there’s a good reason for many workers to want protection against malware on their computers from using the computer camera to spy on them.

    What’s not clear, however, is where the people who were surveyed actually live – and at what time of the year. If the finding is correct, then maybe something like 10% of the workers preferred being naked at home – hence are actual or at least potential naturists. But if the survey was done mostly in the summer, perhaps many who answered simply didn’t have air conditioning or want to use it. How many survey respondents were at home without others around? And were many of the respondents in Western Europe, where naturism is much more popular than in the U. S.? That would seem likely. But it’s an interesting finding anyway. When there’s no reason to wear any clothes – except the force of habit – why bother?

  5. 57 Reasons to get naked

    My own list, with more detailed explanations, is here. However, if anyone thinks they need several good reasons to get naked, they’re missing the point, which is that anytime it’s safe and comfortable to be naked, no other reasons are necessary. Most people who already enjoy nudity already understand this. They know that being naked just feels really good. However, almost everyone else will need extra reasons, and the more the better. So the article offers 57 good ones to choose from. Most of the reasons are in one of these categories:

    • Frequent nudity has a variety of health and emotional benefits.
    • If you seldom wear anything you’ll save money by less often washing clothes or buying new ones.
    • Becoming comfortable naked improves self-confidence and body acceptance.
    • Going naked promotes a sense of freedom from unreasonable social conventions.
    • Wearing nothing lets you just be yourself without needing clothes to project a particular image.
    • Socializing naked with others promotes better relationships.


    Many of these benefits are aspects of good mental health.

  6. Nudist New Year’s resolutions to make

    I’ve already compiled one detailed list here. It’s divided into sections based on how much naturist experience you’ve had. But the list in the present article has a large number of suggestions (in no particular order). Some of the items are things you may already do, but can just as well usually be done… naked, such as reading a book or watching a movie. Others involve more extensive effort.

    An especially important one that’s worth doing often is: “contact governments and nudist organizations to help with advancing nudism.” That should be done frequently! Include public officials at all levels – from your local community all the way up to state and federal officeholders. Those officials need to learn that naturists need smarter, less restrictive laws affecting naturist activities. They should also be reminded that naturism is good for the local tourist industry.


  7. Sleeping nude

    It’s kind of funny how often this topic is written about – as if it were a new idea to most people, who’ve never even considered it. Yes, there are very good reasons to sleep naked, as we’ve noted before. (Here and here.) But possibly one of the best reasons – which is almost never mentioned, except among naturists – is that sleeping naked all or most of the time is a “gateway” to naturism. If you go to bed naked often enough, you’ll realize that nudity is really comfortable. So you’ll have more motivation to be naked at other times besides when you lie down for the night.

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism

Summary: Here’s why you should get into naturism as early as possible and not delay until you’re older.

It seems reasonable to assume that most people who read this blog regularly, or even only occasionally, have at least some interest in naturism or curiosity about it. But there are at least two types of readers. Some have more than occasionally enjoyed nudity at home or participated in social nudity. But others have little or no actual experience with either home or social nudity.

This series of posts may be of interest to people of both types. Those in the first category probably want to learn how to persuade others – such as friends or family members – to join them in naturist activities. Or else they’re enthusiastic naturists wanting to promote naturism to anyone who’s open-minded. On the other hand, people in the second category are still uncertain about whether they would actually enjoy naturism or whether it might be risky to participate in it.

In either case, it makes good sense to be clear about what the benefits of naturism are. Having a clear idea about these benefits is important whether the objective is to persuade others to try naturism or else to persuade oneself about that.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism”