Newsworthy nudity, 2021-3

  1. Grace saddles up for a Lady Godiva style trip through Ludlow for charity (1/26/21)

    Lady Godiva earned a place in history vastly more prominent than that of her husband Leofric, an 11th-century Earl of Mercia in central England. As the story is usually told, Godiva felt compassion for the people of Coventry suffering from her spouse’s exorbitant taxation. Her pleas to him to reduce that burden were without avail, but he agreed to some reduction provided she would ride a horse completely naked through town. If the story’s accurate, he probably was astonished when she took him up on the offer.

    In recent times, nudity has often been used to dramatize protests of many things. But Grace Oakley was determined to follow Godiva’s example, although for a constructive purpose rather than a protest – support for a charity dedicated to prevention of young suicides. (When Grace was only 12 her mother took her own life.) It was 8 months later that Grace finally made her (partially) naked ride through Ludlow (about 60 miles from Godiva’s Coventry). However, by that time she’d raised almost £3000 for her chosen charity. But the effort was probably responsible for donations from many others (who didn’t even need to go naked).

    Other accounts of Oakley’s ride:

  2. Actor strips at ‘French Oscars’ in protest at closure of theatres and cinemas (3/13/21)

    Grace Oakley used public nudity to call attention to a serious social problem, but another example of public naked protest appeared in France months before Grace’s ride. It was a protest against perceived injustice, and it was televised live for the entire country to watch. (Godiva’s protest wasn’t televised, of course.) The broadcast was part of France’s César film awards (equivalent to U.S. “Oscars”). The broadcast host had opened the event with a passionate speech against the closure of French theaters on account of the pandemic, which had already been in progress for over a year.

    French actor Corinne Masiero was to present the award for best costume (appropriately, as it turned out). Masiero wore a costume when she appeared on stage, but promptly removed it and everything else – even her shoes. It’s unclear whether or not the event organizers knew in advance that Masiero would completely divest herself, but she carried out her presentation fully naked on live television without any interruption or censorship – and the audience applauded. No news media treated the scene as scandalous. C’est la France après tout. Whether pandemic precautions were an appropriate target of protest is debatable. But the point was made quite conspicuously.

    Another reaction to the event: Nudity in French Culture – Will it change? (3/13/21)

  3. I couldn’t wait to tell my friends ! (3/25/21)

    Sheryn recounts what happened after she and her husband first visited a naturist club. The “experiment” turned out very well. “It was a bit scary at first. But we had done it and we were hooked.” Unlike most people new to naturism, she could hardly wait to tell her friends about it. The first friend reacted very positively and wanted to try it herself. The second friend was more negative and was sure she wasn’t interested. Yet a year later she’d changed her mind and went with Sheryn for a club visit – and a week later joined the club.

    Of course, Sheryn and her husband live in Britain, where people in general are much more open-minded about naturism than in the U.S. In fact, naturism has become increasingly popular in Britain over the past couple of decades, in contrast to the U.S. where the opposite has happened. (There are several stories about that in this post.) This account illustrates how not being secretive about naturism can have definite rewards – being able to share social nudity with friends, for example. Now when friends visit Sheryn’s home, her husband remains naked. Her friends are used to it and have no complaints.

  4. Naked with Friends (Part 1) (3/8/21)

    Rae was born and raised in the U.S. but moved to Vancouver, British Columbia a few years ago. She and her husband Jay are enthusiastic naturists and often visit Wreck Beach, the local clothing-optional beach and also an inland hot springs. The article’s title reveals that this article and a second part are also about sharing nudity with friends. As is usual, this sharing happens gradually. At first there are isolated and somewhat tentative experiences. But gradually, an increasing number of friends become involved and often thereafter enjoy nudity together. Anyone who enjoys nudity solely at home is missing the pleasure of genuine social naturist nudity.

  5. Fancy getting nude in a cinema full of strangers? Now you can – just BYO towel (4/20/21)

    Unlike in France, at nearly the same point in the pandemic, Australian theaters were not closed. However, in two theaters under the same ownership, in Sydney and Melbourne, it was the audience that could strip naked (if they wanted to). The movie was a Belgian tragi-comedy, Patrick, set in a nudist park – will full nudity often on screen. (Sadly, the film has received very little attention, and doesn’t seem to be available even on DVD, although it isn’t intended as an exploitation of nudity.) The showings were arranged by Hudson Sowada, director of the 2021 Fantastic Film Festival Australia. In fact, Sowada announced, “I’ll introduce the film in Melbourne in my birthday suit.” Here’s a short account of the movie with links to some reviews.

  6. New TV series shows adults stripping naked in front of kids ‘to boost body confidence’ (3/11/21)

    Also on the subject of television nudity, in March 2021 a Dutch TV show (“Simply Naked”) debuted. It’s based on a very similar Danish show “Ultra Strips Down” that debuted 2 years previously. In an image from the new show, “five grown-ups are seen disrobing in front of children and standing in front of them completely naked,” according to a British tabloid. However, the show had no prurient intent. Rather, it was intended to teach kids about body confidence. The show’s host described the series’ purpose as “to help children understand different body shapes.”

    True to customary British tabloid form, the screen image of the disrobing was heavily censored, so as not to disturb prudish, dirty-minded British readers. But youngsters in Holland had no such unease. According to the article, “The kids are shown getting the giggles as the adults strip off.” Probably most of them had seen it all before at home. Even most Brit adults have probably seen it all themselves.

  7. Is There A Nude Campground In Quartzsite? (2/8/21)

    Yes, there definitely is. For some time it’s been known as the Magic Circle, so-named on account of a circular maze constructed of rocks by naturist RVers in one part of a U.S Bureau of Land Management (BLM) camping area near Quartzite, AZ. Unlike National Parks, the BLM has no rules against nudity on most of its land, although local laws may take precedence.

    On most BLM land, campers may stay no longer than 2 weeks. At Magic Circle, however, the limit is 7 months, and many campers stay much of that time, in part because many of them are retired and enjoy the area’s warmth for a large part of the year. So the average age of campers tends to be on the high side. Since so many Magic Circle campers stay for extended periods, they get to know each other. The result is that the place has the vibe of a regular naturist club, including planned social events. Note that there are some general rules. For instance, relocating every 2 weeks is required during the summer. And there are fees: $40 for 2 weeks, or $180 for 7 months.

  8. Doing the Naked Macarena (2/16/21)

    Katrina provides a capsule account of the best things about naturism, all in the process of describing her first experience on a nude cruise in the Caribbean. She and her husband had their first naturist experience at a Caribbean resort a year before the cruise. They were quite uncomfortable with nudity the first day. But by the third day they found total nudity to be completely… natural. Naked bodies are just bodies, and they exist in all shapes and sizes. Just read the story for an idea of what a nude cruise is like. And what about the macarena? Well, that’s just an energetic dance best done naked to allow maximal freedom of movement for all body parts.

    The cruise itself is offered every year by a company called Bare Necessities. You can be naked as much as you want while at sea. But it’s not cheap – for 2 people in a cabin the cost can exceed $20,000, depending on location in the ship. (Singles can share a cabin – and expenses – with another single if desired.) And although the boat hosts 3500 people, a reservation far in advance is a good idea if you want a specific room category. There’s also a Greek isles cruise on a smaller ship if you want a Mediterranean experience.

  9. The UK’s best nudist beaches for families and couples (2/28/21)

    Although the British climate is not exactly ideal for naturism, the UK nevertheless has plenty of coastline – and nudity is possible at many locations. But which ones are “safe” for families with children? Unless a kid has been instructed from an early age that wearing clothes is absolutely necessary, they shouldn’t have a problem with nudity. As the writer notes, “Naturism seems to come naturally to the kids.”

    Still, it makes good sense to choose a beach where nudity is possible but also somewhere that worrying about improper behavior of others is unnecessary. Since youngsters can’t resist an opportunity to swim and jump in the waves, choosing a place with surf that’s not too rough is important. And if no suitable beaches are near the family home, a location should have good dining choices and overnight accommodations. This article suggests 6 good options for families, as well as 3 others more suitable for adults.

  10. A Global Guide to Nude & Topless Sunbathing (3/31/21)

    Here’s a different sort of guide to clothing-optional beaches and topfree sunbathing places. It doesn’t list specific locations. Instead, it provides a general rating of tolerance for skinny-dipping and topfreedom. The guide covers most countries in the world, although its ratings can be vague and uncertain sometimes. The ratings have four color-coded categories:

    • Green: many “official” public locations where nudity is OK
    • Yellow: public nudity is usually unacceptable, but tolerated in specific locations
    • Red: public nudity not acceptable – don’t go there to be naked
    • Grey: insufficient relevant information


    There are color-coded maps of the whole world, including a separate map with individual state details just for the U.S. All countries have individual listings, usually with more details. Only public locations are considered, but the existence of private naturist clubs and resorts may be noted. Some indications of the survey’s methodology and information are provided. The survey was conducted by a British female lingerie/swimwear company (cognitive-dissonance alert) named Pour Moi. The information is provided as of July 2021, and (of course) may be different at a later time.

    Other places where the survey is presented in less complete form:

Bonus from earlier: I spent a week at home in the nude, and this is what I learned about my body (4/3/17)

Cat (her preferred name), from New Zealand, reports “When I read that naturists have higher self-esteem than those who keep their clothes on, I decided to spend a week in the nude in the privacy of my own home to see what I could learn. I hoped that my naked experiment would make me more comfortable with my body and its imperfections.” And so: “I worked, slept, cooked, cleaned, and got on with family life minus my clothes. Although I was a little apprehensive about my nudity project, on the whole I really enjoyed it.”

There were some uncomfortable factors initially. However, “On other days, though, my nudity was liberating and fun. There were even a few moments where I felt profoundly present in my body.” On one rainy afternoon she went into her backyard, forgetting she was nude, but she enjoyed feeling the rain on her skin. Finally, “After spending a week naked at home, the prospect of stripping off in public became less daunting.”

Do you know anyone who’s aware you’re a naturist, seems open-minded, and has the free time? If so, try suggesting they spend a weekend, several days, or a whole week naked at home the whole time – assuming anyone they live with won’t object. Suggest they’ll understand, at least, what you like about naturism. You may find another friend to enjoy naturism with.

Newsworthy nudity, 2021-2

  1. What it’s like to be a life model and pose nude for strangers (2/12/21)

    In the previous edition of this series there was an article about how posing nude as an artist’s model can be a source of empowerment. That was from a male perspective. This article provides a female perspective. It’s noted that “Disrobing in front of a room full of other people who are intently staring at you is way out of most peoples’ comfort zone.” For experienced naturists this should be no problem at all. But it should also be considered by anyone who’s not deathly afraid of being seen naked by others, because it could enhance their self-confidence, and is often a modest source of extra income. Also, of course, it could entice people into trying naturism.

    One problem for many who may be interested in posing nude as a life model is finding a class that’s looking for models. Anywhere that art classes are offered is a possibility. That includes college and junior college art classes, places offering adult education classes, and sometimes classes at art museums. Two related articles (here and here) describe what’s involved in modeling. It’s noted that the average pay for modeling is about $25 per hour, but that probably assumes at least some modeling experience. However, for anyone who wouldn’t mind working naked, the pay could be a secondary matter.

  2. NAKED a Life Modeling Film about Life (2/20/21)
    Review of the film: Irish Film Review: Naked

    The Irish Naturist Association held a virtual event to view a documentary film and discuss it with the film’s director and his life model. The film is available to rent, but the INA provided a review (second link). There are many interesting observations, but the overall message is that “life modeling is empowering.” As one model notes, “once the threshold of fear was crossed, the idea of posing naked was no longer fraught with difficulties.” There’s a great deal for naturists to think about in these observations. In particular, being open about one’s enjoyment of naturism is also empowering. Another comment from the director recognizes a fundamental obstacle naturism faces almost everywhere: “There is a culture of silence against nudity worldwide in the mass media today, and I think it’s very unhealthy.”

  3. Get Naked Australia founder reveals the best things you can do nude from hot air ballooning to rock climbing (2/15/21)

    Get Naked Australia is an organization known to many naturists worldwide through its social media sites on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. The idea originated with Brendan Jones in 2015 and soon became quite popular with young people in Australia who travel to many natural sites in the country to enjoy nudity and be photographed naked. Judging from the photographic evidence, women are well represented in GNA activities, which are quite varied. They include small yacht cruises, rock climbing, hot air ballooning, yoga retreats, camping, and (of course) skinny dipping.

    Such things understandably appeal especially to younger people more than visits to established naturist parks and resorts. The U.S. is desperately in need of young people like Brendan to revitalize naturism in this country. Many young people resist being labeled or regarding their activities as part of a “lifestyle”, and so the idea to just “Get Naked” may have more appeal. (Here’s a similar article on GNA.)

  4. 12 Activities To Try During National Nude Recreation Week (6/18/21)

    This article continues the theme of appealing ways to get naked – other than visiting the more traditional RV parking lot with a swimming pool and clubhouse. “National Nude Recreation Week” is proclaimed (yearly, after July 4) by U.S. naturist organizations to promote naturist activities. To come up with a full list of 12, the article mentions a few rather obvious things (get an all-over tan, skinny dip in the pool) and some stereotypical naturist games involving spherical objects (volleyball, pickleball, golf). So, up to 5 already. Then there are 5k nude races. (Sounds a little strenuous, but 5K is just a bit over 3 miles.) And you can work out at the resort’s gym or practice yoga.

    But other things are possible beyond naturist ghettos. There are World Naked Bike Rides and celebrating World Naked Gardening Day (usually outside the proclaimed week). There’s always naked hiking – anywhere you probably won’t be seen by textiles. And, finally, there are nude cruises – if you can afford them and book far enough in advance. No mention, however, of life modeling or simply having a clothing-optional party for friends in your own home. All-in-all, this isn’t quite Get Naked Australia stuff.

  5. Charlie Max Thinks We Should All Be Cooking Nude (5/26/21)

    Here’s one more thing that’s best done naked. Max is a model and an “OnlyFans creator” – which means she offers NSFW content (for a price). Not having checked that out myself, I can’t say it’s strictly of the naturist sort. But Max does emphasize naturist values in this article. Cooking is certainly another natural activity that can be enjoyed totally naked (with sensible precautions about things that could burn).

    Max makes healthy living in general a priority. In particular, that means “plant-based cooking”. But she also advocates body positivity and nakedness. She argues that food should not only be prepared while nude, but also served and eaten while clothesfree. Max hosts dinner parties for friends while nude herself (with clothing presumably being optional for guests). “Finding comfort, support and acceptance in being nude around my friends allowed me to feel confident in my body,” she avers. Naturists certainly can understand and agree with that.

  6. I tried cooking in the nude (so you can too) (8/4/21, updated 4/25/22))

    Hannah Cole has a positive response to Charlie Max’s article. However, body insecurities and aversion to cold somewhat limit her enthusiasm, as they also do for many naturists. She nevertheless summarizes briefly many good features of naturism. Hannah notes that “Other practising nude cooks mention they feel more creative and less restricted when crafting meals this way.” (The same could be said of many other creative activities, like writing or even software programming.) She goes on to recount her first fully nude cooking effort – especially how “Being in my house sans clothing was cleansing.” In conclusion she says she’s now “open to a more nude-inclusive lifestyle.” The takeaway here is that finding even one activity one can really enjoy naked opens the door to additional involvement in naturism.

  7. Reasons Why Everyone Should Try Skinny Dipping At Least Once (7/3/21)

    The information here is mainly about why skinny dipping is really enjoyable, but there’s a little advice about what people having no experience with skinny dipping should know. This information usually won’t be new to most naturists, unless their experience being naked is mostly in their own homes. Naturists who already know most of this – if they’re open to discussing the subject with others – may be better able to know what information about skinny dipping they should offer to friends. People with little or no naturist experience but are curious about skinny dipping should find the whole article useful.

    The article’s not long, so just read it for the details. People, of course, should already know about things like using sunscreen and what hazards may exist in specific places. Such information applies to swimming anywhere, from a private pool to a popular ocean beach. There probably should be more advice about good naturist and nude beach etiquette. But mainly the information is about why skinny dipping is such a great pleasure – although naturists can make many good points from their own experience, even if they seldom skinny dip.

  8. Going Bare (7/22/21)

    Here are some further thoughts on nudity from Yael Wolfe. She probably wouldn’t think of herself as a naturist, and isn’t advocating nudity at home as a regular practice (the way a naturist might). But she does write about the value of experiencing nudity occasionally for its own sake. “Learning how to be in my body without making judgments about how it measures up to cultural beauty standards. Without feeling dirty, obscene, and shameful.” Because “It feels like liberation. Painful liberation, but liberation all the same.” In other words, exactly what naturists often advocate as a means for body acceptance.

  9. The Sheffield duo who interview strangers completely naked – and how it’s changed their lives (2/6/21)

    Kat Harbourne and Jenny Eells are BBC journalists who in 2017 conceived the idea of doing a podcast in which they as well as guests they interviewed would be naked. The initial idea was to explore issues around body image (just as Yael does in the item just above). It’s called (of course) The Naked Podcast. Although the podcasts concluded after 67 episodes in October 2020, all the episodes are still available at the link just mentioned. It was also written about on this blog: here.

    The present article, which asks how it changed the podcasters’ lives, appeared 4 months after the last episode. Both Kat and Jenny feel that “doing the series for the past few years has helped them and their own body image.” Kat observed that “you don’t need to look or act a certain way to love your body – you don’t need to be a certain size to be happy.” So here again is a message about body acceptance. Naturists simply can’t repeat that enough.

  10. Florida Beaches Guide – Haulover Beach (7/11/21)

    Haulover Beach, just a little north of Miami Beach, is easily the most popular clothing-optional beach in the state. In part that’s because of its proximity to a large city. But it’s also thanks to the efforts over a number of years by the South Florida Free Beaches organization. Thanks to SFFB, Haulover is one of the very small number of U.S. beaches that have an official clothing-optional portion, and the organization maintains a “Beach Ambassador” program to ensure that Haulover remains a safe and enjoyable place, even for families. Tripadvisor has more information on Haulover.

Bonus from earlier: Are you a Naked Person? (3/10/11)

Alden Wicker believes, “Your comfort with nudity says a lot about who you are.” She explains further, “I’m not asking if you’re a nudist, an exhibitionist, or a Playboy model. I’m just asking if you’re comfortable in your nakedness.” In more detail, “I think your view of nakedness says more about you than how conventionally beautiful you are. … I’m not saying naked people are better; they just approach life differently.” So here’s one more affirmation that getting comfortable with ordinary nudity is a dependable facilitator of body acceptance.

Newsworthy nudity, 2021-1

Obviously, there’s been a long gap since the last “Recent articles on nudity and naturism” here, which was for January 1-15, 2021. Two reasons: the relevant newsflow does seem to have slowed down, but even so, time constraints have made it difficult to keep posting new articles on this theme twice a month. So I’ll try a different approach.

Many interesting articles have been noted since January 2021. So the best of those will be included in the new series, as well as anything suitable that comes out in the future. But there won’t be any fixed posting schedule. It will just happen as time permits, and selected items won’t necessarily appear in chronological order. Also, there will usually be less commentary on individual articles than in the past. These changes may allow new posts to appear as often as before.
Continue reading “Newsworthy nudity, 2021-1”

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 6: Congratulations! You’re now a self-confident naturist!

If you’ve been following along with this series of ideas for becoming involved in naturism, by now you’re probably convinced that clothesfree activities should be an important part of your life. Perhaps you already spend a lot of time naked when it’s comfortable and convenient and you’re pretty satisfied with your current naturist activities – yet you’d still like “more of the same”.

On the other hand, quite possibly you want to learn about other naturist activities you may not even be aware of. Or else you’d like to do more things you currently enjoy – except without having to wear any clothes. Either way, you’ll probably still want to explore new ways to enhance your life where clothing simply isn’t necessary.

In either case, you probably want to have more naturist friends – you don’t want the feeling that almost nobody else seems to crave being naked as much as you do.

So let’s think about your current relationship with naturism and then discuss how to expand your participation in it and find other naturist activities to enjoy.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 6: Congratulations! You’re now a self-confident naturist!”

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, January 1-15, 2021

  1. A First Summer At Sunfolk

    In March 2020 British Naturism, Britain’s national naturist organization, purchased a small landed naturist club that had been in operation since 1931, as reported here and here. The property, Sunfolk, is conveniently located about 40 km west of London. It’s also about a 5-minure walk from the better-known Spielplatz, which was founded only 2 years earlier.

    Perhaps because the club had been overshadowed by neighboring Spielplatz, club members had difficulty in maintaining the facility. BN’s purchase will allow for needed redevelopment and safety work. Although BN will own the property, BN won’t directly manage it. The pandemic precluded naturist use during the summer of 2020, but it provided an opportunity for necessary work to be done more quickly, so normal operation could resume in 2021.

    Sunfolk will no longer be a private members’ club, but will welcome members of BN and other naturist federations. BN will also use the facilities as a “campaigning” center where “influencers and policymakers” can learn about naturism first-hand and mingle with actual naturists. BN will also be using the property for naturist events and gatherings.

    Unfortunately, naturist organizations in the U. S. haven’t seriously considered doing something similar. In Southern California alone, 4 naturist parks folded during the past couple of decades, as well as a considerable number of others elsewhere in the country. Here in the U. S., we just don’t have any naturist organizations that tried to help.

    Realistically, because of large distances in the U. S., one place like Sunfolk would hardly be enough for the whole country. There should be several such places that could be managed like Sunfolk. There’s a desperate need for “influencers and policymakers” to learn what naturism is really like. But U. S. naturist organizations, apparently, don’t see that as part of their mission, or simply don’t care.

  2. 8 Incredible Experiences In Valley View Hot Springs

    Here’s another naturist-friendly article from the mainstream travel site Travel Awaits. (Earlier articles were mentioned here.) The subject of the article, Valley View Hot Springs, is a 176-mile drive southwest of Denver, through Colorado’s San Luis Valley. Not only the hot springs, but all the experiences there, and the property itself, are entirely clothing-optional. Even the showers in the toilet building are co-ed. What more could a naturist want?

    Any textiles who happen to visit unaware of the clothing-optional policies may not want to stay long. Yet, as the article notes, you may well find yourself sharing the place with families and their young children, couples of all ages, single men and women, mothers and daughters, and even some teens. In fact, there are about 11,000 visitors annually, so there’s lots of opportunity to chat and enjoy the company of like-minded others. But with over 2000 acres in the property, you can have solitude if you want it.

    What’s there besides the springs? How about, as the article notes, “endless hiking trails”? If hiking naked amid unspoiled natural scenery and vistas appeals to you, this would be the place for it. The springs are located on a 2,200-acre parcel of protected land owned and managed by the Orient Land Trust, which is a non-profit organization, so you won’t have to pay excessively to enjoy your visit. If you do plan to visit, take note of advice in the article about things like making advance reservations, available accommodations, and the fact that there are no hookups or dump stations for RVs.

  3. Love Your Body: Own how you look in 2021

    This article is from the free, “alternative” news magazine Now, of Toronto, Ontario. Being “alternative” means it deals with stories that almost all “mainstream” media would resolutely avoid. “Love Your Body” is actually a once-a-year feature of the magazine, appearing in January.

    Accepting and appreciating the body one has – even if not exactly always “loving” it – is a concept most naturists understand very well. It’s necessary for people who desire to be completely comfortable and at ease being naked, whether or not in the presence of others. But the article isn’t about naturism per se, even though all six individuals profiled are shown fully and explicitly naked – without any image censorship at all.

    The nudity here is totally appropriate, since a major theme (but not the only one) is about how people relate to their bodies. Other themes include feelings concerning gender, ethnic, and life-stage identity. These types of identity are entangled with each other, of course. Physical exposure of one’s body isn’t the only issue here, since emotional and psychological exposure is also involved. These things are often important issues for naturists – especially in the initial stages. However, the physical issues tend to disappear rather quickly the longer one is a naturist. Body acceptance is not only necessary for enjoying naturism, it’s greatly strengthened by naturist activity.

    When naturists recommend trying out naturism to a friend, the usual reaction is negative. Possible excuses typically include a belief that allowing others (except for an intimate partner) to see one’s naked body is “immoral”, forbidden by one’s religion, inappropriately “sexual”, “socially unacceptable”, or something similar. Or maybe they fear being considered “exhibitionists” who get a thrill from “flaunting” their naked bodies. But more likely is that most people assume they’d be embarrassed to go naked, since their body isn’t “perfect” enough.

    The usual – and appropriate – naturist response is that naturists are unconcerned about the appearance of anyone’s naked body. Why? Because physical appearance simply doesn’t matter, since body shame is psychologically unhealthy and needs to be overcome. Bodies come in many colors, shapes, and sizes. So what? Nudity isn’t just something naturists can get “used to”. More often it’s embraced enthusiastically.

    So naturists are able to enjoy nudity’s pleasurable feelings, without concerns that others who respect them – other naturists in particular – might be judgmental about body appearance. Actually participating in naturism may well be the best way to overcome body shame and accept one’s body as it is.

    This article from BuzzFeed News provides, on a single page, a summary (with pictures) of each individual’s take on the subject.

  4. Naturism during lockdown

    Donna Price and her husband John are British naturists who’ve been written about here a few times. (Here, here, and here) Donna is now well-known in British Naturism, since she volunteered to help relaunch BN’s Women in Naturism campaign a little over 2 years ago. She’s been a prominent spokesperson for the effort ever since. John is an equally enthusiastic naturist, and like his wife is naked fulltime at home.

    The news articles cited below seem suspiciously like deliberate PR stories, but that’s OK. Naturism fully deserves fair and accurate coverage in mainstream news media. That’s bound to bring it to the attention of people who’d otherwise have no idea what it’s actually about and may not even recognize the term.

    It’s significant that the first article touches on “nude walks” in the countryside, since the next item after this one gives an example of how such activity doesn’t always go too smoothly. Donna says that “the majority of responses they receive from fellow walkers are ‘actually very encouraging’.” And also, the responses are “not shock horror, majority of the time, I can guarantee that. A lot of people just say ‘good morning’ and carry on.” There’s no mention of what the minority of responses are like. If the couple has encountered serious harassment, let alone threatened arrests, they’re not saying. However, it seems likely that a woman out for a naked walk with her male partner is a lot less at risk from hassles than a naked man by himself.

  5. False arrest for nudity in England

    Half the stories here have been from Britain, and that could be since naturism gets considerably more respect there than in the U. S. (or most countries outside Western Europe, for that matter). The stories, however, aren’t entirely positive. Apparently there are still some British folks who haven’t yet been clued in that public nudity usually is legal in Britain, as long as it’s not sexual or intentionally offensive to others.

    Officers became involved only “after receiving several reports of a naked pedestrian”. A search eventually located the “offender”, an elderly bloke who was strolling naked around rural Waldridge Fell in September, about a mile outside the market town of Chester-le-Street. Police then arrested him “on suspicion of outraging public decency”. Although detained and questioned, he was cooperative and was subsequently released with no further action. The Fell is uninhabited open space. It’s close to, but not visible from, a residential area.

    The incident, however, didn’t make the news until three and a half months later, when the naturist Three Rivers Outdoor Club, based in nearby Newcastle, objected to a police Facebook post that summarized the incident but negligently failed to make clear that public nudity was generally legal in Britain. The group maintained that the post had put “them at risk after wrongly suggesting it was illegal to walk around naked.”

    A spokesperson for the group told the local newspaper “Our events are usually a liberating and joyful experience, but during one walk last summer, one of the ramblers had water thrown over them, whilst the assailant told the group that they shouldn’t be walking naked in public. It is wrong for Durham police to post misleading reports that suggest that public nudity is illegal, and it puts us at greater risk of harassment in future.”

    It’s interesting to read the comments on that Facebook post. Most are supportive of the naturist position. But a few are from the usual dimwits who agonize “but think about the innocent children who might see any naked people!” Even in Britain there are still some who are ignorant of both naturism and the country’s laws.

  6. 10 Benefits of Sleeping Nude You Should Know


    Last, but not least, here’s yet another article on the benefits of sleeping naked. The concept hardly comes as a surprise to almost all naturists. But it’s interesting how often it’s mentioned in more-or-less mainstream media. (See here for more references.) As noted in those references, sleeping naked can be a “gateway” to naturism. Perhaps naturist organizations should focus more on that and other gateways, such as naked yoga, naked hiking, naked exercise, naked life modeling, skinny-dipping in remote places, body painting, etc.

    All these things (mostly) encourage full nudity, but usually outside of traditional naturist venues or in private homes. Naturists, of course, probably enjoy some or many of these things. People who have no problems participating in such activities ought to be comfortable with at least some forms of organized naturism. But it would be good if individual naturists and naturist organizations made more efforts for outreach via gateways to others who know little if anything about traditional naturism.

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 3: Naked and afraid?

Let’s face it. There are many excellent reasons for socializing naked. (A much briefer list is here.) Yet most people don’t actually know any naturists, or at least aren’t aware that anyone they know is a naturist. As a result, most people are likely to have some – or many – misconceptions about what naturism really is. So there’s a real chance that misunderstandings about naturism could cause you to miss out on something great.

This is a vicious circle. Naturists are too often secretive about their enjoyment of nudity, because others may judge them unfairly. So it’s difficult to dispel the erroneous beliefs about naturism, because naturists are afraid to reveal their interest in it. Consequently, the misconceptions fail to be corrected. It would help a lot if naturists would be more open about their enjoyment of nudity. Young naturists, especially, should become more comfortable discussing naturism with their peers.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 3: Naked and afraid?”

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism

Summary: Here’s why you should get into naturism as early as possible and not delay until you’re older.

It seems reasonable to assume that most people who read this blog regularly, or even only occasionally, have at least some interest in naturism or curiosity about it. But there are at least two types of readers. Some have more than occasionally enjoyed nudity at home or participated in social nudity. But others have little or no actual experience with either home or social nudity.

This series of posts may be of interest to people of both types. Those in the first category probably want to learn how to persuade others – such as friends or family members – to join them in naturist activities. Or else they’re enthusiastic naturists wanting to promote naturism to anyone who’s open-minded. On the other hand, people in the second category are still uncertain about whether they would actually enjoy naturism or whether it might be risky to participate in it.

In either case, it makes good sense to be clear about what the benefits of naturism are. Having a clear idea about these benefits is important whether the objective is to persuade others to try naturism or else to persuade oneself about that.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism”

What are naturists’ thoughts and feelings when they’re naked?

Let’s first consider the thoughts and feelings non-naturists have when they’re naked around others. The list would include sexuality, self-consciousness, embarrassment, body dysmorphia, shame, guilt, anxiety, fear, insecurity, and vulnerability. Most non-naturists won’t experience each of these things when naked, at least not at the same time. But they’re very likely to experience some of them.

The contrast with the thoughts and feelings of naturists when they’re naked could hardly be larger. That list would include freedom, openness, self-confidence, exhilaration, euphoria, and self-actualization. Again, most naturists won’t usually experience all these things at the same time. Indeed, a large part of the time many naturists will hardly even be thinking about the fact they’re naked. Yet the positive emotions will still be there and contribute to a distinct feeling of happiness, contentment, and well-being.

Of course, non-naturists do have many opportunities to experience these positive emotions. But all the same opportunities are also available to naturists if they’re willing to accept the inconvenience of wearing clothes when nudity isn’t possible. Fortunately, there are many places where nudity is possible – in a naturist’s own home and the homes of other naturists, as well as the homes of open-minded friends and relatives. And also in naturist resorts, naturist-friendly B&Bs, clothing-optional beaches, and many locations in the natural world.

In short, naturists can enjoy all the positive experiences available to non-naturists. But they are also able to enjoy positive experiences that are either significantly enhanced or only possible by being naked.

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, November 16-30, 2020

  1. Patrick: The Movie

    Patrick received 4 stars (out of 5) in the Guardian review. It has 87% positive reviews at Rotten Tomatoes. But can you find it on IMDB? No. Is there a DVD of it on Amazon (which owns IMDB)? No. So what’s the problem? Apparently it must be the dreaded nudity. Indeed, that includes full-frontal male nudity. (See the first review listed below.)

    After all, the setting is a rustic naturist park, where many of the people are naked. Horror of horrors. At least Wikipedia deigned to allow a (very) brief page for it – which mainly just lists the many accolades the movie has received.

    A few films, such as Educating Julie and Act Naturally, that feature nudist park scenes have been made in recent decades. (Both are listed at IMDB.) But they don’t have the heft or mainstream critical approval that Patrick has. Unlike those other films, in Patrick the nudist park setting isn’t central to the plot, and the nudity is treated quite nonchalantly – as it should be. Check out the reviews below for more information. Unfortunately, I don’t know how you can actually see the movie for yourself.

  2. Controversy surrounds new sculpture of Mary Wollstonecraft, asking is nudity necessary?


    You really have to ask yourself what’s wrong with people who wonder whether nudity in a serious work of art is “necessary” – let alone as something a person might choose to enjoy in everyday life. Isn’t it enough that the artist – or person who enjoys nudity – has reason to feel that nudity enhances their art – or their lifestyle?

    In this case, Mary Wollstonecraft isn’t nearly as well known to the general public as her daughter, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley – who’s famous as the author of Frankenstein and the spouse of Percy Bysshe Shelley.

    Yet Ms. Wollstonecraft certainly deserves to be much better known. According to Wikipedia, she “was an English writer, philosopher, and advocate of women’s rights.” Indeed, today she “is regarded as one of the founding feminist philosophers, and feminists often cite both her life and her works as important influences.”

    So what could explain why the sculptor, Maggi Hambling, opted for nudity in the Wollstonecraft memorial? Why should that be considered controversial or even disrespectful? Was it either controversial or disrespectful that Michelangelo chose to portray David nude? How about how Rodin chose to portray his Thinker? It’s quite likely there were very good reasons in both cases. So why should there be any difference for Hambling’s choice? Simply because Wollstonecraft was a woman?

    I certainly don’t think there should be any difference, but I can only speculate about Hambling’s intentions. This appraisal of the statue posits that the figure isn’t a representation of Wollstonecraft herself but instead of Everywoman. Could it be that portraying the figure nude was meant to be a sign of empowerment? That unselfconscious nudity indicates strength, self-confidence, and equality with strong males?

  3. Getting naked for charity


    British Naturism has a history of charitable support for the British Heart Foundation. (See here.) The choice of a health-related charity isn’t random, since a clothes-free lifestyle is felt to confer health and well-being benefits. The connection, in part, is a result of stress reduction and enhanced closeness to nature. Simply taking time off from everyday obligations to enjoy nudity is a big factor. Holding such events at carefully curated gardens is also relevant. On the other side of the planet, in New Zealand, another naturist group held a fundraiser for a local hospital – and a member cited “stripping down the stress” as an important feature.

    Non-naturist organizations of various kinds have also used (limited) nudity as a way to get attention in addition to supporting worthwhile charities. Noteworthy examples include diverse sporting teams – often connected with an educational institution – that have also taken this route by selling calendars with coyly posed nudity. Recent examples include veterinary students at two Australian schools, as reported here. However, this sort of thing has at times been done somewhat clumsily, as noted in one example reported in an item below.

    It’s rather unfortunate that U. S. naturist organizations have taken so little advantage of charity support for gaining attention and improving their image – as well as helping out deserving charities.



  4. Being naked and improved body acceptance go together


    An aspect of the connection between nudity and health is how body acceptance is involved. Naturists understand that being comfortable naked requires acceptance of one’s body the way it is. Increasing body acceptance leads to more time spent naked, and that in turn leads to enjoying more of the health benefits of nudity, such as those due to stress reduction and better sleep.

    However, this relationship is complicated. Physical fitness is also important for good health. Steps taken to improve fitness, such as healthy eating and adequate exercise not only improve health, but also help improve body acceptance. There’s a positive feedback loop in the relationship among body acceptance, nudity, health, and fitness. Each of these things tends to reinforce the others. The healthier you are, the more you’re likely to enjoy being naked – and vice versa. This relationship was explicitly recognized by the earliest modern naturists over 100 years ago. Plenty of exercise and a healthy lifestyle were strongly emphasized.

    • How to be more comfortable in your own skin
      “Taking charge of your own negative thoughts can be one of the toughest things to do when you don’t feel confident in your own skin. … You often critique yourself and feel shy around others, rather than embracing yourself for who you are as an individual! … It’s important to love yourself and appreciate you for you! That’s why we’ve gathered some tips on how to be more comfortable in your own skin, naked or not.”

    • Naked body image and self esteem
      This report is based on research by Keon West of the Department of Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London. The research has previously been described here and here.

      “For people predisposed to take part in non-sexual nude activities body image, self-esteem, and life-satisfaction are improved by such participation. Now, research … suggests that for people who may not be predisposed to such activities, a nudity-based intervention may nevertheless lead to positive improvements in body image.”

      This is another article on the same topic: Nudism: how it can actually boost positive body image

  5. Everything You Wanted To Know About Being A Naturist But Were Afraid To Ask


    You don’t really need a whole book to explain how to be a naturist. The first and most important step is simply to start spending time naked – alone, or with others if possible. But of course you’ll have some important questions on your mind too. This concise article at a website about travel deals with some of the most common questions. It’s especially intended for people in the U. S., where naturism is more controversial and less well accepted than in many European countries.

    Since the website is dedicated to travel and vacations, not surprisingly it suggests the first steps into naturism outside the home may well involve travel or vacationing. There’s much good advice here. But the key thing to keep in mind is simply to be naked when doing what you especially enjoy. It doesn’t matter much whether that’s sports, exercise, cruising, camping, hiking, or going to the beach. Here’s the mantra: “Whatever You Enjoy Doing, Doing It Nude Makes It So Much Better”. Well, maybe not shopping or going out for dinner, but you get the idea.

    Given the site’s dedication to travel and vacation, you should take a look at their page of related naturist information.

  6. No Tan Lines Here, Clothing-Optional Parks See Uptick


    To continue on the topic of travel and vacations, here’s an article from a mainstream magazine for people who visit or manage private campgrounds – especially for RV camping. It points out that naturist parks usually welcome RVers and are well-equipped for them. Most naturists with RVs already know this, so the article is actually inviting people who’ve never been involved with naturism to give it a try.

    While most RVers looking for naked camping probably are already naturists, non-naturist RVers represent a promising group whose members might seriously consider the clothesfree option.

    From the article: “To dress or not to dress? Probably not a question RVers ask each other too often. And probably not something which crosses the minds of those in the campground business. But believe it or not, there are a growing number of RVers who choose not to dress when they are camping, preferring to recreate at campgrounds in the buff.”

  7. Nothing new about using nudity in politics and protest

    As an article in a Toronto newspaper – written by Stéphane Deschênes, owner of the Bare Oaks Family Naturist Park – points out, “Nudity has long been a tactic used to generate attention, in both politics and protest. One of the most famous incidents, Lady Godiva’s nude protest on horseback, is over 1,000 years old. Here in Canada, in the early 20th century, the Doukhobors protested religious persecution and demonstrated their humbleness by marching nude — men, women, and children.”

    A number of other examples are cited, including PETA‘s antifur campaign, World Naked Bike Rides, last year’s Portland, Oregon Black Lives Matter protest, and FEMEN demonstrations in support of feminist issues.

    Stéphane observes that “nudity will retain its ability to shock and bring attention to political and social issues.” And further, “While using nudity to expose injustice or promote a cause may seem cheap or exploitative to some, there’s no doubt that when one believes it’s worth it to be bare down to their toes in service of creating change, it’s bound to make headlines.”

    Naked political and social protests have been discussed several times previously – most recently here.

  8. I earn £45 an hour to clean people’s houses in the nude


    Naked house cleaning hasn’t received much attention recently, but evidently it continues to be popular in the UK. This article by “Brandy” gives a first-hand account of what it’s like to work naked doing house cleaning for strangers (or regular customers). She had grown tired of her previous job, at the age of 38, and was looking for something different and more interesting. Brandy says she really wanted to work in professional gardening, but needed income while learning the ropes of gardening.

    She reports that most of her clients are male, and have always been respectful: “I have to say that I’ve never had to clean for anyone yet who has made me feel creepy. They’ve always treated me with absolute respect.” Her feelings about the work are very positive: “It’s definitely an unusual job, and I won’t do it forever – I still plan to be a gardener – but it’s got me out of a dark period, and it’s been liberating. I’ve got to tell you, I love it.”

    With the pay being £45 (currently about US$62) per hour, it surely has a great advantage over waiting tables or driving for Uber. For anyone who enjoys nudity there’s the exquisite pleasure of working naked. And it’s certainly a much more socially acceptable job than working in a strip club.



  9. Cambridge University students strip down for racy calendar with nothing but athletics equipment to protect their modesty to raise money for medical charity

    This is another example of university athletes supporting a charity by producing for sale a calendar featuring (partial) nudity. Unfortunately, this particular instance is a rather embarrassing flop. Even if you have a very positive attitude towards nudity, this isn’t something you’d be proud to have on your wall. Although it’s probably been sold out for some time now, a better option is still available: making your charitable contributions directly to the beneficiaries.

    Here are the negatives of this one:

    1. Supposedly because of the need for social distancing, the athlete models were photographed separately and photoshopped (very poorly) onto the background. Very fakey.
    2. The idea of college jocks showing off their (not quite) naked bods for “charity” is no longer fresh and original. Don’t Cambridge students have enough imagination and creativity to come up with new ideas?
    3. The tabloid-quality wording of the article is off-putting – with lowbrow phrases like “racy snaps”, “protect their modesty”, “stripped down”, and “bare all” (which is a lie).
    4. There’s no frontal nudity, so this is nothing but exploitation of ersatz nudity.

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, October 1-15, 2020

  1. The World’s Best Nude Beaches

    Reports of the “best” beaches where nudity is acceptable and common (generally termed “nude beaches”) are a favorite of some mainstream media that want to attract readers interested in topics commonly considered “risqué”. A distinguishing characteristic of real naturists is that they don’t consider most beaches where clothing actually is optional to be risqué. But obviously, the writers of the article cited here aren’t naturists. Right in the article’s second sentence they use the term “naturalist” instead of “naturist”.

    That mistake doesn’t necessarily invalidate their choice of beaches to write about. Any beach that most people would consider to be a pretty good beach would be fine with a naturist as long as it’s possible to feel safe and comfortable being naked there. The choice of beaches in this particular article is probably somewhat subjective. In fact, there’s only one beach that this list has in common with the beaches more objectively selected in this list – Valalta, in Croatia. But so what? Naturists should find any beach in either list quite agreeable, as long as nudity is actually common and accepted there.

    Interestingly, some of the beaches in this article’s list are in Italy, Turkey, Latvia, or South Africa – which are not likely to be on the travel itinerary of most naturists. The beaches may, nonetheless, very well be considered fine by most naturists. Several U. S. beaches that most U. S. naturists know about are on the list – Haulover (Florida), Hippie Hollow (Texas), Little Beach (Hawaii), Black’s (California), and Gunnison (New Jersey). Even those beaches might be rather distant from most U. S. naturists – but at least a passport wouldn’t be necessary to visit any of them.

  2. Nude beaches and resorts near Toronto and the rising popularity of naturism


    Many people, including naturists, would be surprised that Canada is another country with good and popular clothing-optional beaches. One that’s perhaps more widely known is Wreck Beach in Vancouver. But Toronto also has a popular nude beach: Hanlan’s Point. It’s at least sufficiently well-known to have its own Wikipedia page.

    The article is more about naturism generally in the Toronto area than just the beach. It’s from the perspective of a woman who first went topfree on a French beach during a vacation. She found that experience “exhilarating, but also kind of scary”. But more experience with naturism gave the realization that being naked in a naturist place is no sweat, because “literally no one cares.”

    She poses the question “What is it about being nude that can feel so overwhelmingly daunting for some, yet for others, it’s no big deal?” The experience of being naked with others varies widely, because everyone has different social conditioning – so “In fact, for many people, it’s empowering.”


  3. You should start sleeping naked: Here are 5 super convincing reasons


    The general mainstream attitude towards nudity – as we all know – is mostly negative. But surprisingly, there’s one case where the attitude is not only positive, but sometimes downright enthusiastic. At least, that seems to be what one could conclude from reading a typical article in mainstream media about sleeping naked.

    The articles usually cite a number of reasons, especially health benefits, from sleeping naked. The article linked here is just one of a huge number. Don’t believe it? Just try Googling “sleeping naked”. The resulting list just goes on, and on, and on. There are at least 200 articles, just since 2014. And there are additional reasons besides the health benefits – such as comfort due to the absence of restrictive clothing, and (of course) greater intimacy when sleeping with someone else.

    That doesn’t mean that many minds will be changed as a result. It’s rather unlikely most people will come across any article on the topic just by chance. But naturists should bring up the topic as a way of introducing naturist ideas in a conversation with friends. If any skepticism is encountered about the health benefits, simply challenge the skeptics to go check with Google themselves.

    When statistics are presented about how many people actually sleep naked most of the time, the numbers range from under 10% to 70% or more (at least for Millennials). You may find many among your friends actually do sleep naked, at least sometimes. But for those who don’t, just suggest they give it a try. Who knows? If people try it and make it a habit, they may be interested in exploring nudity more generally.

    For experienced naturists, sleeping naked probably is almost universal. So here’s the naturist perspective on sleeping naked: Should I Sleep Naked? Yes, Start Tonight!


  4. Getting naked around strangers improves your body image, study finds


    This was covered back in June, here. The present article provides more details of the experiment. Keon West, the researcher, himself observes “More replication is always a good idea, and it would also be good to test these hypotheses on some different populations. So far, the research has really focused on White, European participants.”

    Not only that, but with only 51 participants – half in the experimental group and the other half in the control group – this is a pretty small sample. In addition, participants were volunteers who knew that nudity might be involved – not individuals randomly selected from the population. Still, it’s quite consistent with the experience of naturists who find improved body image after becoming involved in naturism. And that’s a good thing, even though it may be confirmation bias after having been told that social nudity improves one’s body image – and expecting that outcome.


  5. Nudist couple says lockdown has tripled membership of British Naturism


    It’s already been covered that membership in some naturist organizations has surged in spite of a need for social distancing and even lockdowns because of the pandemic.

    Just how big is the “surge”? Well, there are some misleading statements about it that need explanation. A statistic mentioned in one of the earlier articles is that since the start of the British lockdown in March 2020 the number of new members of British Naturism rose from 184 to 930 – presumably in the same period of time before and after. That’s a 5-fold increase (or 400%) – but only in numbers of new members. That’s absolutely not the increase in total BN membership. (In November 2020 BN advocated to Parliament for greater tolerance of naturist, non-sexual nudity and claimed a total membership of “over 9000”.) While the increase in new members is impressive, implying the total membership has “tripled” is rather misleading.

    Nevertheless, something positive for naturism in Britain is certainly going on. The article here is based on an interview with BN activists Donna and John Price. They offer some observations that help explain what’s going on.

    The couple has spent “most days dressed only in their birthday suits and doing everything from gardening to baking and household chores in the all together”. They’ve taken full advantage of their organization’s extensive online video opportunities for interacting with other naturists in spite of being mostly confined to their own property. As Donna explained, since “the events are virtual, they are open to people from all over the world, so we’ve met naturists we probably wouldn’t otherwise have crossed paths with. We’ve been doing all sorts during lockdown – yoga sessions, coffee mornings, cooking classes, life-drawing, discussion panels and evening drinks – all virtual and all naked.”

    It’s also claimed that another reason for the sharp increase in BN membership could be that attitudes towards nudity – at least in Britain – are becoming more relaxed and less unfavorable. A BN spokesperson suggested that “the whole taboo around nudity is eroding. As the decades have gone by, we’ve become less prudish and repressed.” And furthermore, “nudity isn’t that scary subject anymore. Attitudes are changing. People may not call themselves naturists but are increasingly doing nude things and not thinking too much about it.”

    Let’s hope that’s all correct. But progress also tends to experience pushback from people who can’t overcome their social conditioning and are intolerant of positive changes. Worryingly, the opposition to family naturist swims in England seems to be increasing – see here and another example next. Naturists need to fight back.

  6. UK naturists lose more naturist family swims because of hysterical right-wing Brits and Covid-19
    • Blackpool’s Sandcastle Waterpark bans Naturists from hosting nude swim events with children
      This example demonstrates perfectly what naturism is up against. It has nothing to do with the pandemic – except perhaps indirectly due to the increasing popularity of naturism during the pandemic. This event and an earlier one were sponsored by BN, and open to all members. It seems that similar swim events organized by local naturist clubs continue to be held without restrictions on children.

    • Naked family swim at Alton Towers waterpark cancelled due to Covid-19
      Alton Towers is a hotel with a water park and a theme park in Staffordshire. For 14 years before this year BN has rented the hotel and water park for a whole weekend in November, usually having a sell-out crowd of about 400 members of naturist families. But this year the event has been canceled, because it would breach pandemic protocols. So this is one negative for naturism caused by the pandemic. A previous report on the event is here.

  7. It’s the nude renaissance: Why lockdown is a great time to get your kit off

    The phrase “get your kit off” is a dead giveaway that the writer is British – and probably a naturist. Both suppositions are correct, as confirmed by the writer when she admits “Getting naked on a public beach is easily the most thrilling thing I’ve done since the start of lockdown. Thanks to my enforced hiatus from travelling this year, I’ve missed the heady rush of endorphins that exploring a new country brings.”

    So here’s another reason that the pandemic has stimulated many more people to experience naturism – at least in Britain. The writer, Tracey Davies, lives near Brighton Beach, part of which is one of the most popular UK clothing-optional beaches. “It seems that lockdown has sparked a nude renaissance – which is why I headed down to our nudist beach to see what all the fuss is about,” Tracey confesses. Thus one impetus for a “nude renaissance” is that the monotony of being severely limited in options for new experiences has led to discovering a previously overlooked option that remains available – the pleasure of enjoying nudity in the sunshine on a clothing-optional beach.

    Will naturism continue to increase in popularity when (and if) the pandemic subsides? Long-term naturists and new enthusiasts will need to continue exerting effort to keep the popularity of naturism increasing.

  8. The History of Nudity in the Western Region


    The Western Region of AANR (the American Association for Nude Recreation), also known as AANR-West, comprises the states Hawaii, California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, and Wyoming (and the western half of Mexico, too).

    California, because of its mild climate and open-minded attitudes of many of its inhabitants, was a leader in the growth of U. S. naturism during the 1930s. Lupin, in the Northern California hills above San Jose, was established in 1935 and is still going strong. Fraternity Elysia was established a year earlier in the Southern California mountains above Lake Elsinore. It underwent a series of name changes, first to Olympic Fields, then McConville, then finally to Mystic Oaks – but closed finally in 2008.

    The article here very briefly touches on various events in the history of AANR-West. There are also links to 7 other articles that provide more details on specific naturist topics and locations (mostly in California). This is quite far from a reasonably complete history, even of the early years. But it’s a nice high-level overview.

  9. If you go down to the woods today: adventures in nudist Paris

    Many articles on naturism in mainstream media – such as this one – are written by women. That’s noteworthy mainly because (unfortunately) many more men than women are active naturists. Yet it’s good to have the perspective of a female writer. Although the writer is less likely to be or become a naturist (as in this case), she’s somewhat more likely to show naturists how reasonable others perceive them.

    The reporter for this assignment, Pamela Druckerman, is actually having her first experience with naturisme (the preferred French term). Her first surprise was that almost everyone was male in the Paris park she visited, which was set aside for naturism. That severe imbalance isn’t typical of most naturist places, especially in France. But, unfortunately, it’s not too uncommon either.

    Pamela notes that Paris does have “an active naturist subculture that includes this city-approved zone in the forest, weekly naked nights at a municipal pool and occasional clothes-free bike rides, museum visits and garage sales.” She doesn’t undress at the park, and doesn’t really have much to say about it. But she does meet one naturist woman there, “Marie”. Later she accepts Marie’s invitation to attend a naked swimming night at an open-air swimming pool for aqua-exercises – and actually gets naked there.

    She doesn’t, however, particularly enjoy the experience. That’s in part for a surprising reason: “The naturist movement’s resolute non-sexuality bothers me too. Other people’s bodies suddenly seem demystified and banal. … Why take the pleasant erotic charge out of a leisure experience like sunbathing or swimming?” She also has body-image issues.

    Although Pamela doesn’t find the nudity of others particularly objectionable, it’s clear that naturism really isn’t her cup of tea. And that’s fine. To be a naturist requires a certain taste for the pleasures of naturist nudity. Non-naturists, it seems, simply can’t grasp the separation of sexual and non-sexual nudity. Both are good. But they’re fundamentally different things.

    That being so, Pamela clearly wasn’t a good choice for giving readers a reasonable feel for what naturism is actually about. This counts as a failure for mainstream media (The Economist magazine, in this case.) But it’s useful to help naturists understand why more people don’t share their enthusiasm.

  10. The naturist couple that travels the world naked

    Mainstream media seem to consider it newsworthy that naturists would seek out – and find – the opportunity to enjoy nudity in delightful places around the world. Naturists having sufficient resources and/or determination for world travel, at least. Some of these places are widely known – to naturists, anyhow – while others are genuine hidden gems. This article features the well-known naturist bloggers Nick and Lins, of the Naked Wanderings blog.