Recent articles on nudity and naturism, December 1-15, 2020

  1. We Hosted Our Own Naked Party: Here’s What Happened

    Most people understand the idea of “do it yourself”. Whenever you need something done, there are basically two options: pay someone else to do it, or… do it yourself. Your car needs some repairs, you need to update a room in your house to meet your needs, you need to prepare food for a party for 20 people, your child needs extra help in school with math, you’d like to start a vegetable garden to grow some of your own food… Or whatever. Each of these tasks requires at least certain minimal skills or experience – which you may not currently have.

    But there are problems with hiring someone else to take on such things. You’ll have to pay them. They won’t do the job to your satisfaction or not do quite what you had in mind. You might not even be able to find someone suitable for doing the work.

    Naturists encounter this dilemma – a lot. Naturist resorts you’d like to visit in order to socialize with other naturists are either too far away, have limited facilities, are in a dilapidated state, or don’t attract the sort of people you’d like to meet. Non-landed clubs you might consider joining are poorly run, have only boring activities, or seldom have many activities at all.

    What’s the solution? Do it yourself! In this case, you can hold your own parties and events for naturists you know or others you know who might like to learn about naturism from people they trust (i. e., you). The article here gives good advice about how to do it. Almost no special skills are usually required. And not much experience either. If you’ve been a naturist for a least a little while, you probably have all of the necessary experience, because you know what naturists expect and enjoy. As for skills, go with what you already have. Probably some ability at food planning and preparation. Some knowledge of activities other naturists would enjoy. And enough social skills to ensure people have a good time.

    You don’t need to depend on “organized” naturism to provide what you want. You can do it yourself. And here’s an earlier post about naturist parties: What individual naturists could do to promote naturism – and why

  2. Free Beaches Make Dollars and Sense

    Here’s a very slickly-produced short (about 5½ min.) video that clearly explains why states and communities adjacent to good beaches – and their local businesses – can experience significant extra income from the establishment of clothing-optional sections of the beaches.

    This video is from the Tampa Bay Free Beaches organization. They’re working to have a legal clothing-optional beach on the west coast of Florida. Florida’s east coast already has four such beaches, including the very popular Haulover Beach near Miami. (That link is from a tourist site, and here’s another from the same organization on clothing-optional beaches in Florida.) Yet the west coast doesn’t have any legal clothing-optional beaches, even though there are many naturist parks and resorts near Tampa (mainly in Pasco County).

    But such naturist places can’t have the economic impact of a clothing-optional beach. There are several reasons for this. One is that many of these places have large populations of full-time (naturist) residents. But these residents don’t contribute more to the local economy than any other local residents. Tourists, on the other hand, mostly aren’t naturists, but they do visit clothing-optional beaches and spend lots of money in the area. Most importantly, they vastly outnumber local naturists.

    Many people don’t care to live in Florida full-time, for various reasons. Yet Florida is a very popular tourist destination for many reasons, including a warm climate and numerous tourist attractions and theme parks. Visitors to any of these attractions may also be interested in clothing-optional beaches, which are quite scarce in other parts of the country. Many visitors also arrive not only from the U. S. itself but from all over the world – including countries where naturism is popular.

    It’s not necessary to say more about the economic importance of clothing-optional beaches here, as this post goes into considerable detail on the subject. And here’s a post from November 2020 with similar information on the newest clothing-optional beach on Florida’s east coast: Blind Creek Beach, near Fort Pierce. Diligent work of the Treasure Coast Naturists group made it possible.

  3. Woman posing naked outside museum wins ‘Best Bum 2020’ contest after Cambridge uni students bared all


    Obviously, this article is just clickbait for the tabloid’s site. But it does illustrate a fairly recent and interesting trend. Namely, fully naked butts are no longer considered “obscene” or unfit for “decent” people to see (although they’re probably NSFW). Facebook and its ilk agree, despite rabid hostility to frontal nudity. Not so long ago, a person’s butt crack in pictures like this would be heavily blurred, pixellated, or strategically covered by an emoticon or black bar.

    There’s more to this story than simply how it’s presented in certain British media. It shows that, at least in England, college students are willing to pose naked for amusing and playful – yet tasteful – photos. Nothing basically wrong with that.

  4. Pro surfer who has tackled some of the world’s largest waves goes on a NUDE surfing trip


    This story in a different British tabloid doesn’t make fun of nudity, yet some of the language it uses (“intimate”, “completely naked”, “bold display”, “incredible”) makes quite clear the tabloid’s attitude towards nudity. Clearly, too, the story is aimed at lower-class Brits in the way it (sometimes, not consistently) uses black bars to obscure what that type of person considers “naughty” to depict.

    However, the photos themselves (from a “three year audio-visual project”) are quite tasteful and striking. There’s also a short (and heavily censored) clip from a 4-minute short documentary called “Skin Deep”. The pro surfer and artist (Felicity Palmateer) wanted to combine “her passions of art and surfing in a bold display of self expression” Oddly, however, although the documentary was very artistic and aimed to show “self expression” it was felt necessary that “The filming sessions for Skin Deep had to be carefully curated so that Ms Palmateer could comfortably surf while in secrecy”. It’s sad that such beautiful imagery was treated as if it were simply porn.

  5. Growing interest in naturism since first lockdown

    Here’s an interesting story about naturism in a local Irish newspaper. Several points stand out. The first, and perhaps the most important, is that the report takes naturism seriously. That contrasts markedly with how naturism is treated in the U. S. (or even in British tabloids). There’s no intimation that there’s anything weird, peculiar, or abnormal about someone who enjoys being naked (in suitable circumstances). Second, the person who was interviewed (Michael) emphasizes that when someone has become used to being naked, it feels entirely normal and unremarkable not to wear anything as long as nobody objects – and more comfortable than wearing clothes. Third, naturism is becoming more popular and acceptable in Ireland, in contrast with the fairly recent past.

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism

Summary: Here’s why you should get into naturism as early as possible and not delay until you’re older.

It seems reasonable to assume that most people who read this blog regularly, or even only occasionally, have at least some interest in naturism or curiosity about it. But there are at least two types of readers. Some have more than occasionally enjoyed nudity at home or participated in social nudity. But others have little or no actual experience with either home or social nudity.

This series of posts may be of interest to people of both types. Those in the first category probably want to learn how to persuade others – such as friends or family members – to join them in naturist activities. Or else they’re enthusiastic naturists wanting to promote naturism to anyone who’s open-minded. On the other hand, people in the second category are still uncertain about whether they would actually enjoy naturism or whether it might be risky to participate in it.

In either case, it makes good sense to be clear about what the benefits of naturism are. Having a clear idea about these benefits is important whether the objective is to persuade others to try naturism or else to persuade oneself about that.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism”

Are you a naked person?

By “naked person” I mean, specifically, someone who often or almost always prefers to wear nothing – or as close to nothing as possible – that covers any part of their body. That term generally includes many nudists and naturists. It also includes people who live mostly without clothing because that’s the norm in the culture or society they belong to – although presently that’s quite a small number. But it doesn’t include people like exhibitionists who use nudity only for sexual gratification or to shock others.

Of course, the main concern here is with nudists and naturists who live in societies or cultures where nudity is far from the norm. In other words, under social conditions where nudity is acceptable or at least tolerated only in limited circumstances, such as in private homes or a few places where nudity is socially and legally permissible.

The point I want to make about being a “naked person” is that it should be considered a conscious affirmation of personal identity. That is to say, a state of being of significant and substantial worth in itself, and one that merits the respect of others. The deliberate choice to wear no clothing should be no different from any other clothing choice. So naked persons rightly feel that their choice to be naked is just as valid and deserving of respect as any other clothing choice. And that’s because their choice strongly reflects their personal identity.

Although most people in U. S. society – as well as the societies of many European countries – don’t wear types of clothing required by certain religious or cultural traditions, those latter choices are accepted. And that’s because it’s recognized that such choices strongly reflect the personal identities of those who make them. Someone who is, for example, Amish, Muslim, or Orthodox Jewish wears clothing that accords with their religion, because that has deep meaning for who they are. And even though choosing to wear no clothing is very seldom for religious reasons – except for modern pagans – it has every bit as much meaning for someone who self-identifies as a naked person.

Of course, many – probably most – people use additional visible means besides clothing to express personal identity. Women, and sometimes men, have long used makeup for this purpose. Hairstyles, including facial hair for men, are certainly in this category too. Tattoos have now become very popular for this purpose. The same is true for body jewelry (even though it may be visible only in the absence of clothing).

It’s true that many nudists and naturists don’t think of their enjoyment of nudity in terms of personal identity. They like being naked simply because it “feels so good” or it’s “much more comfortable” than wearing clothes. They don’t consciously think they’re “making a statement” by being naked. And that’s fine.

Yet the truth is that wearing nothing actually does convey a person’s identity, whether intentionally or not. The verb “convey” means passing some sort of information from one person to others. This is just as much the case as with the choices people make in what they wear at work (whether it’s a business suit or jeans and T-shirt), on social occasions, or in any other situation where other people are present.

Nudity qualifies as part of the identity of someone who openly expresses pleasure in being naked. So choosing to be naked reflects that identity and signals it to anyone who observes them.

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, November 1-15, 2020

  1. Why Germans love getting naked in public

    Like almost all generalizations about particular societies and cultures, this is a popular stereotype that has some truth to it, but only partially. The truth here is that a larger percentage of Germans enjoy public nudity occasionally than in most other countries. Munich’s Englischer Garten (pictured above), which has had nude use since the 1960s, as well as banks along the Isar river, are popular places for public nudity. But the percentage enjoying public nudity is still hardly a majority.

    Even if the percentage of Germans who are naked in public parks, beaches, spas, saunas, etc. is, say, 25%, it’s not certain whether the generalization is valid. There’s probably a greater tolerance of public and private nudity in Germany than in almost all other countries, and that’s good. But it’s unclear whether the trend of popularity of and tolerance for public nudity is up or down. The headline of the article is, at best, misleading.

    The article itself observes that
    Since East Germany merged with the larger West in 1990 and restrictions lifted in the former communist state, FKK culture has declined. In the 1970s and ‘80s, hundreds of thousands of nudists packed campgrounds, beaches and parks. In 2019, the German Association for Free Body Culture counted only 30,000-plus registered members – many of whom were in their 50s and 60s.

    But the low figure of FKK members is itself misleading. It’s usually possible to enjoy naturism and social nudity without belonging to a large organization. Around the world, the tendency in most types of formal organizations – from scouting groups to fraternal lodges – is that membership has been steadily declining. But membership in a formal organization simply isn’t any more necessary for participating in social nudity than for pastimes such as playing tennis or chess. Most such things are personal lifestyle choices that don’t require membership in an organization – many of which do continue to exist.

    Various factors can account for the membership decline. Many of them affect membership organizations in general, not just those related to naturism. There are, however, a few that may specifically affect naturism. For one thing, if there are increasing numbers of people interested in a particular clothing-optional activity, private and pubic businesses such as swimming pools and gymnasiums can satisfy the demand either on a pay-per-use basis, or even by public funding. For instance, a public swimming pool in Spain.

    For an example specific to Germany, there are estimated to be about 300 spa/saunas in the country, with nudity expected in most or all of them. There’s one other thing to consider with Germany. The climate simply isn’t as favorable for naturism as in Spain, Croatia, or southern France. Many German naturists probably visit such places as much or maybe more than places in their country. They’re also likely to enjoy social nudity indoors at spas and saunas for much of the year – or in their own homes.

    Private naturist parks are much less necessary when nudity is permitted in public parks and other facilities, as well as many outdoor areas (hiking trails, lakes, rivers, etc.). In countries like Spain, Germany, and even England and Ireland, nonsexual nudity is generally legal if it’s not intended to cause alarm or distress to others. So why pay dues to some organization just to enjoy not wearing clothes?

    Another factor is that once an activity becomes more popular there’s less need to participate in it covertly in a private organization. The activity is, at least, respectable and tolerated, even if not preferred by a majority.

    This suggests that the way forward for naturism in many countries isn’t mainly through large private organizations. Instead, it’s by establishing informal local groups and using them to promote public acceptance of naturism in local areas. The general public will have a better opinion of naturism if it earns favorable publicity and its members are respected local people. Larger national and regional naturist organizations are valuable when they regularly provide various clothesfree activities for their members. British Naturism is a good example.

  2. Erding Spa


    Therme Erding is one of Germany’s most popular spas. In fact, it claims to be the world’s largest spa. It’s located 31 km from Munich and accessible via public transportation. There are both textile and textile-free parts of the spa complex. The saunas are textile-free, as is normal in European saunas. According to the article cited, which is from a travel agency, the complex includes a wellness, massage, and beauty treatment center. There are also overnight accommodations. So it’s quite possible to enjoy a multi-day clothesfree vacation right there.

  3. Should I share with my friends and family that I am a nudist?


    Yes, absolutely! Provided, that is, you can handle the possible negative repercussions. I just wrote at some length about why that needs to be done – when you’re confident that naturism is wholesome and good.

    Here’s the short answer. When you tell your family, and they understand, from what you tell them, what’s so good about naturism, they should support you. Some may even start to enjoy being naked themselves. Of course, it’s a problem if they’re not sufficiently open-minded to appreciate your explanations.

    When you tell friends you trust to understand your viewpoint, don’t discourage them from telling others they know who will be sympathetic with the idea. Eventually, some of those others will be people who also enjoy being naked, and they can become friends with you.

    Another reason to tell people you’re a naturist is that it gives you a chance to explain what naturism really is, what naturists actually do, why naturism is often misunderstood, and why misconceptions about naturism are wrong. Not only does this help improve the understanding of naturism, but it lets you explain why you enjoy it so much.

  4. Naturism As A Lifestyle


    For many people who enjoy naturism outside their homes, the focus is on places to go – beaches, clubs, resorts, cruises, festivals, etc. There’s certainly nothing wrong with that. Many of these people also enjoy being naked at home. But for others, habitual nudity simply isn’t a part of their everyday lives. That is, it’s not part of an encompassing lifestyle. This could be for various reasons. Perhaps some living in the home aren’t comfortable with nudity, or there may be frequent visits from neighbors, friends, and relatives who might not even be aware of their host’s fondness for nudity. Everyone needs to organize their lives in a way that works best for them and those they live with.

    However, naturism is most fulfilling when it can be a regular and normal part of everyday life. Nudity is quite compatible with most things one typically does frequently at home – preparing and eating meals, cleaning and maintaining the home, or just relaxing with music, books, or video entertainment. But being considered a “lifestyle” entails more than that. It’s a set of attitudes and values that the human body is sufficient just as it is, and has no need to be covered in everyday life, except for physical comfort.

    Clothing has practical value for keeping the body warm if necessary. But it also has a social function that tempts people to “dress up” to impress others, indicate social affinities, or create a possibly misleading personal image. By eschewing unnecessary clothes, naturists show that they value personal authenticity.

    The citied article originally appeared here (in a way that was needlessly difficult to read).

  5. Oh! Calcutta!: How nude 70s stage show could still rouse the critics


    Few people born after 1989 – the year that Oh! Calcutta! was on stage in New York for the last time – probably have any idea of its significance. It was the first mainstream musical or dramatic production in which actors were on stage, fully naked and under good lighting for long periods of time. In much the same way as the Woodstock festival and naked hippies (1969), it represents just about the first time in recent history that the general public became aware that nudity need not be quarantined in art galleries, “nudist colonies”, or Playboy-like magazines.

    I was fortunate to have attended several performances in New York and London. So what I can say about the show is based on actually having seen it, not merely read about it. As one of the actors, Linda Marlowe, is quoted in the cited article saying, “society has moved on and no one would accept a lot of it now. I’ve always considered myself a feminist but at the time I think we found the material less of a problem than we would now.” She also notes that the scripts were entirely the work of male authors, some of the sketches involve male fantasies, women are victims in some sketches, and there’s nothing from the LGBT point of view.

    Well, sure. We’re talking about something that first appeared 50 years ago. Hairstyles, for example, popular with young males were also different at that time (long sideburns but few beards). Many of the sketches even then were regarded as “campy” – absurdly exaggerated, artificial, or affected in a usually humorous way. Many of them had sexual themes (novice swingers, a song about masturbation). However, some of the dance numbers, such as the closing act (watch here) and “Oh Clarence” were very good.


    What, then, is the significance of Oh! Calcutta! for naturists today? Paintings and sculptures of nudes had been part of mainstream culture for centuries. Photography of nudes had been also since shortly after cameras were invented. But Oh! Calcutta! made artistic, live, open nudity something that the English-speaking general public could witness – if they chose to. It was an early, tentative step toward the normalization of nudity.

    Nowadays live full nudity in public performances of many kinds isn’t exactly common – but neither is it quite rare. There are numerous examples:


    A variety of events in which anyone can participate naked – such as World Naked Bike Rides, Bare-to-breakers marathons, public body painting, and the Fremont Solstice Parade – are also offshoots.

  6. An Interview With Holistic Business Coach Jamie White

    Jamie White contends that “the problems we have in our personal lives are likely to impact our professional life.” Clearly, if a person in a position of responsibility has personal problems that occupy too much of his/her attention, the person’s professional responsibilities may suffer.

    A situation where Jaime would be expected to swim nude troubled him. Since he had no experience swimming nude “It brought up a lot of fear, anxiety and worry in me.” Any unfamiliar situation, not just nudity, could have the same effect. After examining the fears and worries he realized they actually did more harm than good. He decided the worries were unfounded and interfered with obtaining something he wanted. So he dismissed them.

    This is a good approach that naturists can use to persuade others that embracing nudity in suitable circumstances could be rewarding. As a naturist, by credibly explaining how naturism has enhanced your life, you can argue it’s worth the effort to overcome fears and worries about nudity. So you may gain another person to enjoy nudity with.

    Jaime concluded that “if more people were openly naked for example say whilst swimming, sun bathing, in saunas, beaches etc. it would help people have more confidence in themselves and also less bodily anxieties.” And enhanced self-confidence is of value in becoming successful in many other activities besides naturism.

  7. Nudity and health

    Here are three perspectives on a perennial naturist topic that’s been popular since the earliest days of naturism. It’s not always clear how nudity actually figures into these benefits. Perhaps the main thing is that naturists are more aware of their bodies than people who are almost always clothed. As a result, they’re inclined to take good care of their bodies. Clothed people, on the other hand, may be more likely to identify with what they wear than what they are underneath their clothes. Just a possibility.

    • Fitness!
      Among naturists the practice of naked yoga has received considerable attention. There are some yoga studios that offer occasional classes where students, and often teachers, may be naked. British Naturism too offers live naked yoga instruction by video, as well as a forum for discussion of the topic. But yoga is just one type of fitness exercise. General naked fitness training has also been available for some time but receives less attention. It’s also available online from British Naturism. A few online commercial services also provide naked yoga and/or fitness videos, although nudity itself might be the primary attraction.

      I may do a whole post on the general topic, but the post cited here provides a high-level introduction to the idea. After all, most people know that vigorous exercise is usually good for health. Exercise equipment like treadmills, stationary bikes, rowing machines, etc. has been available for many years. But it’s often neglected after a few months since, candidly, using it is rather boring. Being naked while using it, however, could be an effective solution for that problem. Certainly a good excuse to strip off, if you need one, especially if you sweat heavily.

    • 7 Benefits of Sleeping Naked: You Really Should Know
      I noted here that there are many articles on the health benefits of sleeping naked. This is yet another one. Of the 7 benefits cited, the most cogent may be that any clothing can become constrictive and interfere with blood circulation. That means less oxygen to all parts of the body and inhibited removal of CO2. When you’re asleep you won’t be able to adjust clothing that becomes too tight.

    • Health benefits of being naked
      Although rather skimpy on details, this piece suggests that “Wearing restrictive clothing can cause excessive sweating which may lead to inflammation of the skin follicles, rashes and breakouts. Going bare gives your skin a chance to breathe.”

  8. Naked Run 30: Bare Burro 5k

    Naked running is an activity that’s popular with a certain subset of naturists. Since the typical race distance is 5 km – about 3.1 miles – participation isn’t exactly limited to super-athletes. Things like this are as much social events – with activities sometimes spread over a weekend – as athletic competitions. The event description itself notes that “it’s three days of sun and fun and runs and relaxation.” And that’s fine, since it’s for people who simply want to challenge themselves, especially if they can do it naked. The event described here – the Bare Burro 5K race – is held at Olive Dell Ranch in southern California.

    If you’re interested in this sort of thing and southern California is conveniently located for you, another run, the “Bare Booty 5k Fun Run“, is scheduled for September 26, 2021, at DeAnza Springs Resort.

  9. Best Places in the World to Vacation Naked

    I’ve mentioned the site, gogirlfriend.com, before as a useful resource for women interested in getting naked on vacation. The present article is subtitled “Top Nudist hot-spots that will blow your mind”. Among the possibilities listed are nude cruises, a mineral spa, a genuine nudist/naturist resort, an Australian beach, and a nude hot spring. All of these are high quality, although whether they’re truly “best” in the world is disputable. Unfortunately, most of the other options definitely offer “more” that isn’t naturist.

New Meetup group: Naturists in the Modesto Area

After years of naturist participation and blogging, I’m in the process of organizing a naturist Meetup group for the Modesto, California area. (Think of the area as within about 100 miles of the city.) If you’re in the area and interested, go to

https://www.meetup.com/naturists-in-the-modesto-area

to learn more and request to join. (You’ll need to get a Meetup.com account if you don’t already have one.)

Here is the current description of the group:

Our group is for anyone who enjoys non-sexual social nudity. We’ll have clothing-optional activities to interest almost any naturist, such as visits to naturist clubs, home parties, potluck meals and picnics, swimming pool gatherings, camping, hiking, visits to nude beaches, online video chats, community outreach, and any other traditional naturist activity.

If you currently enjoy nudity mainly at home, this is an opportunity to find others like yourself. First-timers and anyone sincerely interested in naturism is welcome. All activities will be appropriate for your whole family, even those who aren’t quite ready to participate fully clothesfree.

In a Meetup group there’s the opportunity for members to communicate among themselves in a discussion area on the site, on a mailing list, and by private messaging with other members. If you already have naturist friends, this could be a good way to stay in touch with each other. So if you choose to join, please invite other nearby naturists you know to consider joining too.

Note that Modesto is about 60 miles from Laguna del Sol, easily the best naturist destination in the area, perhaps even in Northern California. It should be an ideal place for occasional organized events, or simply for group members to get together in smaller groups in a clothesfree environment.

If you have further questions before joining at Meetup, feel free to ask them in the comments here.

What sorts of things do you especially enjoy doing naked?

Since this is a naturist blog, I mean only non-sexual things, of course.

Dan Carlson’s blog very recently had a most interesting post: What Kind of Nudist are YOU? As phrased, the question suggests that “nudists” (and equivalently, “naturists”) tend to belong to distinct “kinds”, “types”, or “categories”.

Dan backs away from that sort of interpretation, yet he still offers 11 different categories to which he asks readers to assign themselves, although multiple categories are allowed. The categories are given snarky names, like “Jello-shot nudie crowd”, “Wine-foodie naturist snob”, “Life until death nudist”, and “Yoga-wellness guru”. Seriously, how many people who enjoy nudity would care to be regarded as members of categories like that? You’ll have to read the article for an explanation of how the categories are defined.
Continue reading “What sorts of things do you especially enjoy doing naked?”

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, August 1-15, 2020

  1. I Never Thought Nudity Was a Big Deal

    On a recent trip to Florida, Evelyn and her mother had checked into a hotel. She writes that “After a shower, I toweled off, slipping on a robe to grab the delivery I’d ordered. Then, I’d tossed the scratchy monster on the bed, and naked is how I stayed — and how I will forever prefer to stay.” Clearly, Evelyn is comfortable with her nudity.

    But unexpectedly, “I heard a keycard beep and the door-handle said, click”, and, fully exposed, she saw that “a housekeeper stood in my doorway with her arms full of towels.”

    The next day, after plenty of time to process the event, she realized “I’d never questioned my love of private nudity. Since puberty, when my parents fought me to wear a bra, I’ve loved the sensation of my skin against the open air. I also assumed, like me, most people didn’t care about disrobing in secret. We’re all born naked and get nude at least once a day. Is it so strange to enjoy our natural state? The answer is, of course not.”

    Evelyn’s eventual conclusion: “Somewhere along the line, society decided nudity is weird, and it became the norm to cover up, even off the record. … I couldn’t find one reason why this rule needed to apply to anyone who doesn’t want to follow it.”

    Here’s the thing: There are lots and lots of people like Evelyn. Nudity – at least in private – feels normal to them, and they enjoy it. But they know that “society” thinks it’s an aberration – even though that’s just plain wrong. Almost everyone like Evelyn is only a short step away from deciding that naturism is for them. All they need is for someone to come along and welcome them into the fold.

    If you’re a lot like Evelyn, but don’t yet consider yourself a naturist, why not? This is your invitation. (Perhaps this blog post will address some of your concerns.)


  2. The Clothing Optional Retirement Plan

    I can’t resist including this article, for a reason noted at the end, even though it’s undated and may have appeared before August. The article’s about choosing a naturist park or resort as a place to retire in. If you’re young, you’ve probably thought little or nothing about retirement. But once you’re near retirement age, you’ll probably think about it a lot. If you’re still healthy when you retire, you may be satisfied to continue living right where you are. But as the years go by, you may want to consider moving – probably to a smaller home. A large home, perhaps with a large yard, is more than you really need, and requires considerable work to keep up – work you don’t feel like doing much longer.

    If you’re a naturist, there’s much to like about the idea of retiring to a naturist community, besides having a smaller, more easily maintained home to live in. Here are some other obvious advantages:

    1. You can be naked most of the time.
    2. You’ll spend much less time doing laundry.
    3. You’ll have the company every day of many others – both visitors and full-time residents – who enjoy nudity as much as you do.
    4. Almost all naturist communities have one or more swimming pools and spas, perhaps a well-equipped gym and a decent restaurant within walking distance, and probably other amenities and recreational facilities as well.
    5. You’ll be in a gated community with excellent security.
    6. You can relocate to a part of the country with a milder climate than where you came from.


    Are there downsides? Well, if you’re lucky, there may be a good naturist community even closer to where you have family and friends. But more likely you won’t be living as close to family and friends as you were before. And quite possibly, even if family and friends aren’t too far away, many may be uncomfortable visiting a place full of naked people. On the other hand, they might actually be intrigued by that possibility – and even think seriously about becoming naturists themselves.

    Now, what was it I found especially interesting about this article? It’s the fact that the article seems to have appeared last year, but at the end it links to a page that lists many naturist places in the U. S. Unfortunately, that page is quite out of date. How do I know? Because that page is on this blog’s website, but hasn’t been updated in about 14 years. So (I’m sorry to say) it can’t be relied on. I won’t link to it, but if you really want to see it, search on this phrase: “Where to be Naked in the U. S.” There are a number of other places you could look for the informaation, such as this Wikipedia page, or this one from the AANR.

  3. More People Getting Naked During Coronavirus: When Clothing Is Optional, What About Masks?


    There have, surprisingly, been a number of articles published that find it strange for naturists to wear masks because of the pandemic. Already noted here was another article about this from the same source. And here are additional examples mentioned in the present article: (1) You Can Leave Your Mask On: Nudists Wear Just One Item in Covid Times, (2) The Ongoing Battle to Convince Nudists to Wear Face Masks, (3) Clothes off, masks on: America’s nudist resorts reopen, (4) ‘You can leave your mask on’: Nudists adapt to Covid times, (5) Getting naked in quarantine: Interest peaks in nudist lifestyle during COVID-19 pandemic.

    It’s really rather silly, however, to suppose sensible naturists would seriously object to wearing a mask for protection of themselves and others. Most naturists are health-conscious, practical people who wear shoes or sandals to protect their feet when necessary or some sort of actual clothing when cold. Masks are just another example of being prudent. To imply that naturists don’t exercise good judgment is sort of a put-down.

    But this article is a good one, and presents a rather positive view of naturism. For one thing, it cites accounts that some naturists organizations have noticed a surge in membership, attributed in part to offerings of online naturist activities using video technology. Just consider the following reports, from Ireland, as examples.


  4. Irish Naturist Association sees surge in numbers joining nudist group during lockdown

    Here’s the gist of the story:
    A growing number of people are stripping off across Ireland to help themselves cope with the woes of life in lockdown. According to Newstalk, there has been a surge in the number of people showing an interest in joining the Irish Naturist Association. This has been partially attributed to the Covid-19 restrictions in place across the country, with many exploring new ways of letting off steam and enjoying their natural surroundings. The Irish Naturist Association is reporting a 31% increase in new memberships between May and July. Speaking to The Hard Shoulder, member Ciara Boud cited the fact many have more free time on their hands during lockdown to explore such options.

    If you’re surprised that naturism is now popular in Ireland, there are other posts on the topic: here and here. And there’s another article on how the lockdown has stimulated interest in naturism in Ireland: ‘You get accustomed to it’ – Irish Naturist Association sees surge in memberships. That mentions one possible reason for the new interest in naturism: “Maybe people had more time to be online, they’re looking up stuff.”

    In other countries besides Ireland the national naturist organization reported a notable increase in membership. Here are some reports from England.

  5. Nutritionist Non-Confidential: what to eat to look good naked


    The nutritional advice in this article isn’t especially unusual, and if you’re concerned about healthy eating – as you should be, whether or not you enjoy being naked – there’s probably not much here you don’t already know. So why take note of this article at all? It certainly starts off in a nudity-positive way:

    Whether you’re an avid subscriber to the Skinny Dip Club or like to dance around your condo in the nude every once in a while, there’s no denying that there are few things that feel quite as exhilarating as flaunting your birthday suit.

    Other than that, there’s really nothing of special interest to naturists. No doubt the main intention was for the headline and first paragraph to grab readers’ attention. Nevertheless, it’s a good sign that an enthusiastic viewpoint on nudity would have the desired effect.

  6. Naturism as a Way of Living

    When measured by time spent naked, naturists occupy a broad spectrum – from “only if I’m in the mood to visit a clothing-optional beach or naturist resort” to “absolutely as much as possible”. It’s all good as far as naturism is concerned. But the ideas and practice of naturism, in general, will prosper the most if the largest number of people gravitate to the “as much as possible” end. It makes sense to say that people toward the often-naked end “have a naked lifestyle” or “embrace living naked”.

    Exactly why is this good for naturism? There are many reasons why it’s good for all naturists if there are more people who have a naked lifestyle. Friends and relatives of such people will become more used to seeing nudity, and they’ll understand better why it’s enjoyed. Being naked will be considered more “normal” and less crazy or eccentric by the general population. There will be more visitors to naturist parks and resorts, hence more can afford to open and offer a wider variety of facilities. People will feel freer to dispense with some or all clothing in everyday social situations. There will be more pressure for allowing nudity at least in parts of public beaches and parks. Repressive laws against nonsexual nudity in suitable places will be weakened or eliminated. And so on.

    The article cited above makes the case that naturists aren’t merely “naked people”, indistinguishable from other naturists. Rather, they are people who value being free of clothes as an important part of their life. An analogy is offered between naturists and people who value practicing yoga or vegetarian eating. But that doesn’t mean being clothesfree, practicing yoga, or abstaining from meat is something that defines them. Each of these interests will occupy different portions of someone’s life. However, the simple fact that someone openly enjoys any of these things tends to “normalize” that interest to everyone who knows the person. Consequently, the interest can become more understandable and acceptable to everyone else.


  7. Naked fundraiser at botanic gardens hailed a success

    England has many impressive privately-owned gardens, thanks to centuries of wealthy owners of private country estates who devoted part of their leisure time to overseeing the cultivation of stately gardens. Some of these gardens have been open for visits from the public (for a modest fee), and also for private events, such as weddings, parties, and business meetings. A few of these gardens have hosted occasional clothing-optional events for naturists. The Abbey House Gardens is perhaps the best-known of this number.

    As noted here, the Fullers Mill Garden hosted an clothing-optional event on the evening of August 9. It was arranged by British Naturism, and a large part of the proceeds from ticket sales was contributed to charity. According to the news article, the event was “hailed as a success”. Sadly, the U. S. has fewer private venues of this sort, since experiencing this kind of splendid garden seems perfect for being enjoyed naked.

Naturist New Year’s resolutions

Sure, you may already have a list of resolutions for the new year – which, if things go as usual, you may not manage to fully keep. So having more suggestions might not be what you were hoping for. However, since you’re a naturist, or at least may have seriously considered becoming one, there are some important resolutions you should consider adding to the list.

If you’re curious enough about naturism to be reading a blog like this, one of the most important things you could be thinking about for the coming year is how to spend a lot more time being naked. So if it would help to keep things simple, here’s the single resolution that should go on your list:

This year I’m going to step up my involvement in naturist activities.

Continue reading “Naturist New Year’s resolutions”

Are there many people who enjoy nudity at home but don’t visit nude beaches and resorts?

Naturism is often thought of as enjoying nudity in the presence of others (not in one’s immediate family) by sunbathing and skinny-dipping at clothing-optional beaches, being naked while hiking or camping in remote places, visiting naturist campgrounds and resorts near where one lives, or traveling (for those who can afford it) to well-known large-scale naturist facilities in countries like France, Spain, or Croatia. That’s certainly what most national and regional naturist organizations have usually promoted (sometimes under the label of “nude recreation”) – at least before Covid-19 arrived.

But what about enjoying frequent nudity right in one’s own home and back yard? Haven’t significant numbers of people been doing that for decades, even before the pandemic? Isn’t that just as much “real” naturism too – and possibly something enjoyed by far more people?
Continue reading “Are there many people who enjoy nudity at home but don’t visit nude beaches and resorts?”

Seriously, why might you really want to have a naked lifestyle?

Yes, of course, being totally naked just plain feels great – at least under the right conditions of temperature, social and physical environment, etc. But there’s more to life than just feeling great, isn’t there? Other good responses that answer the question “Why be naked?” are many and varied.

The reasons for wearing nothing whenever possible go well beyond just how great it feels. There are various good reasons why being clothesfree is a healthy lifestyle, both physically and psychologically. But there’s a lot more than that. Some of the best reasons for naked living, however, are subtle and more difficult to articulate. Here are some possibilities to consider for choosing to live naked:

  1. Being unencumbered by any clothing – even shoes – allows you to feel much closer to the natural world.
  2. When you’re completely naked, there are fewer inessential barriers – emotionally as well as physically – between yourself and others – especially (but not only) when everyone around you is naked too.
  3. Dispensing with clothes eliminates the possibility – and the burden – of using clothes as a type of armor or disguise to unnecessarily protect or conceal yourself from others.
  4. Living naked challenges you to accept and be at ease with yourself and your body just as they are, without pretense, embarrassment, or shame.
  5. When people interact without the misdirection of clothing, the value of “authenticity” is easier to appreciate.
  6. Without the artifice or distraction of any clothes, it’s easier to think about and discuss with others things that matter more than physical appearance or mundane trivia.
  7. With others who are naked it’s easier and less awkward to have honest, useful conversations about your body and theirs – including topics related to nakedness itself.
  8. When you’re comfortable being naked with others, you’re predisposed to feel more at ease, closer, and more trusting. Being naked is an offer of trust.
  9. Makng strong, satisfying friendships with others who enjoy nudity is easier because of the significant interest existing in common.
  10. Elminating clothes from your life as much as possible leads you to question more seriously what is important and real around you and disregard things that are neither.
  11. When we’re wearing nothing at all, it’s easier (in Shakespeare’s words) to “speak what we feel, not what we ought to say.”

Image credit: Mona Kuhn