Recent articles on nudity and naturism, December 16-31, 2020



  1. Naturist travel and vacations

    The website TravelAwaits seems to offer good information on a popular topic: travel and vacations. One nice feature is that it deals separately with a number of different types of travel, such as weekend getaways, family vacations, cruises, RVing and camping, budget travel, and a few others. Rather unusually for a travel website for the general public, naturist travel is also one of the types covered.

    Although December is not exactly the best month for naturist travel in the northern hemisphere, there are 3 articles offered in that month:

    • 8 Best European Nude Beaches
      Lists of “best” clothing-optional beaches are common, of course. But this list is a good one. As the article says, “You’ve got to hand it to the Europeans. When it comes to vacationing, they know how to do it properly. They don’t think twice about taking off for three weeks in the summer, nor leaving their clothes behind with their laptops.” Three of the beaches are in France, which has long been a top naturist destination, as explained here. The article’s first choice is Montalivet, for good reasons. (It’s the beach pictured above.)

    • The Ultimate Naturist Vacation Packing List: Things You Must Bring And What To Leave Behind
      Frequent travelers know pretty well what they need to bring with them. But there are a few additions (and deletions) to consider for a naturist vacation. You will need just a few clothes (at least for getting to the location), as few as possible. Depending on exactly what type of vacation you’re considering – camping, nude resort, or cruise – there may be some additional things to include.

    • 6 Reasons Nude Vacations Are Becoming More Popular
      If you’re an experienced naturist you know how good being naked feels (when done in a nudity-friendly environment). And lots of fun activities are even more fun without clothes. Once you’ve discovered this, you’ll know why nude vacations are becoming more popular.


    Previous articles on that site were: 8 Top Naturist Resorts In France and Everything You Wanted To Know About Being A Naturist But Were Afraid To Ask

  2. Growing up with nudists


    If you haven’t experienced being a child in a family in which it was normal, or at least not unusual, to wear nothing, you may well be envious of anyone who’s had that good fortune. Here’s an article from someone who had that experience – in a naturist camp, no less – until he was an adult. He kept a cottage there, which he used off and on for 30 years after he left.

    Michael Ruehle writes about the 25-acre naturist camp in Canada, where he spent his childhood living with his family. The camp, Sun Valley Gardens, has been closed for the last 15 years. At its peak in the 1960s and 70s, “there were about 500 adult members, and it was one of the largest nudist clubs in North America, with members coming from as far as Toronto, Montreal, Boston, and Cleveland,” according to Michael. This was in spite of its relatively small physical size.

    The camp was started around 1956 by his father, Karl, who had immigrated from Germany. He had been inspired by naturism in his own youth and wanted to continue after moving to Canada. Unlike many naturists in the 1950s (and even up to now), Karl was not secretive about naturism. He occasionally invited neighbors, local politicians, and news media to visit. As a result, “instead of being harassed, the place was quite quickly accepted by the authorities.”

    Michael goes on to write a lot more about the camp during the time it was most successful, but he says only a little about his own childhood experiences, except to note that
    We never concealed where we lived, so it was the subject of a lot of curiosity among the other kids. But most of my friends, male or female, were permitted to come visit me — another benefit of the “open house” policy, because their parents had presumably visited. I had another large group of friends at Sun Valley Gardens as well, who would be there either on weekends or for two or three weeks at a time, and I would see them every summer.

    Related information:

    • Nudists bare all for journalist June Callwood
      An actual 13-minute video from a 1961 TV interview of Michael’s parents.

    • SLIDESHOW SPECIAL | Naturism in Niagara
      A set of 40 slides, some in restored color, of historical views of Sun Valley Gardens in the early years. (The property has not been maintained and is now decrepit, as some recent pictures show.) There’s also a long recent article on the camp’s history.

  3. Local Opportunities for Naturism

    Rye is a town in the southeast of England, about 75 miles and slightly less than 2 hours from London. It’s on the coast and has a population of about 9000. The article here appeared in the local newspaper and could easily serve as a glowing advertisement for naturism. For example, here’s how it describes the activities of the local naturist group:

    East Sussex Naturists is a loose social group of naturists who, until 2020 closed most things down, were arranging visits to local art galleries, pub meals, yoga classes, regular weekly swims at local facilities, countryside walks and cycle rides in Kent and Sussex, ten-pin bowling and more – yes, and all without wearing clothes!

    Right there you have a variety of activities whose extent far surpasses that of most local groups in the U. S. – of which there are actually rather few anyway. Why aren’t there more? Part of the answer probably is that very few local news media these days would publish such a favorable report on naturism in their area. (Obvious, very likely reason: local naturists groups these days are not media savvy, and make little, if any, effort to cultivate good relations with their community and local media, unlike what Sun Valley Gardens did way back in the 1950s.)

    So, given the poor public relations efforts of most local naturist groups in the U. S. now, why should non-naturists have a positive opinion of naturism, let alone consider participating in a naturist activity? Why would any U. S. naturist (except for maybe a few in Florida living close to a naturist resort) think – even in their wildest imagination – that local media might offer such a positive take on naturism?

    General U. S. attitudes towards naturism are still, relatively speaking, in the stone age. And, if anything, only becoming less favorable as time goes on. Local news media (such as still exist, anyhow) simply reflect cluelessness, because, in the absence of outreach from naturist groups, the media just perpetuate existing uninformed attitudes. And that only magnifies the failure of the public to understand naturism.

  4. One in 10 employees enjoy working from home in the nude


    That finding is rather surprising – but what it really means depends on the details. It’s from a survey by Kaspersky Lab, a multinational cybersecurity company – whose headquarters is in Moscow. Hmmm. Its main product is antivirus software. The company has been suspected, according to Wikipedia, of including malware in some of its software. But that’s not the issue here, whether or not the suspicion is correct.

    Why would an antivirus software company have made such a finding, or even asked about it in a survey? The answer is that, because of the pandemic, a large percentage of company employees have been working at home instead of in an office. And so those employees don’t obviously need to wear customary office attire – or anything at all, for that matter. If the finding is correct, then there’s a good reason for many workers to want protection against malware on their computers from using the computer camera to spy on them.

    What’s not clear, however, is where the people who were surveyed actually live – and at what time of the year. If the finding is correct, then maybe something like 10% of the workers preferred being naked at home – hence are actual or at least potential naturists. But if the survey was done mostly in the summer, perhaps many who answered simply didn’t have air conditioning or want to use it. How many survey respondents were at home without others around? And were many of the respondents in Western Europe, where naturism is much more popular than in the U. S.? That would seem likely. But it’s an interesting finding anyway. When there’s no reason to wear any clothes – except the force of habit – why bother?

  5. 57 Reasons to get naked

    My own list, with more detailed explanations, is here. However, if anyone thinks they need several good reasons to get naked, they’re missing the point, which is that anytime it’s safe and comfortable to be naked, no other reasons are necessary. Most people who already enjoy nudity already understand this. They know that being naked just feels really good. However, almost everyone else will need extra reasons, and the more the better. So the article offers 57 good ones to choose from. Most of the reasons are in one of these categories:

    • Frequent nudity has a variety of health and emotional benefits.
    • If you seldom wear anything you’ll save money by less often washing clothes or buying new ones.
    • Becoming comfortable naked improves self-confidence and body acceptance.
    • Going naked promotes a sense of freedom from unreasonable social conventions.
    • Wearing nothing lets you just be yourself without needing clothes to project a particular image.
    • Socializing naked with others promotes better relationships.


    Many of these benefits are aspects of good mental health.

  6. Nudist New Year’s resolutions to make

    I’ve already compiled one detailed list here. It’s divided into sections based on how much naturist experience you’ve had. But the list in the present article has a large number of suggestions (in no particular order). Some of the items are things you may already do, but can just as well usually be done… naked, such as reading a book or watching a movie. Others involve more extensive effort.

    An especially important one that’s worth doing often is: “contact governments and nudist organizations to help with advancing nudism.” That should be done frequently! Include public officials at all levels – from your local community all the way up to state and federal officeholders. Those officials need to learn that naturists need smarter, less restrictive laws affecting naturist activities. They should also be reminded that naturism is good for the local tourist industry.


  7. Sleeping nude

    It’s kind of funny how often this topic is written about – as if it were a new idea to most people, who’ve never even considered it. Yes, there are very good reasons to sleep naked, as we’ve noted before. (Here and here.) But possibly one of the best reasons – which is almost never mentioned, except among naturists – is that sleeping naked all or most of the time is a “gateway” to naturism. If you go to bed naked often enough, you’ll realize that nudity is really comfortable. So you’ll have more motivation to be naked at other times besides when you lie down for the night.

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 3: Naked and afraid?

Let’s face it. There are many excellent reasons for socializing naked. (A much briefer list is here.) Yet most people don’t actually know any naturists, or at least aren’t aware that anyone they know is a naturist. As a result, most people are likely to have some – or many – misconceptions about what naturism really is. So there’s a real chance that misunderstandings about naturism could cause you to miss out on something great.

This is a vicious circle. Naturists are too often secretive about their enjoyment of nudity, because others may judge them unfairly. So it’s difficult to dispel the erroneous beliefs about naturism, because naturists are afraid to reveal their interest in it. Consequently, the misconceptions fail to be corrected. It would help a lot if naturists would be more open about their enjoyment of nudity. Young naturists, especially, should become more comfortable discussing naturism with their peers.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 3: Naked and afraid?”

How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism

Summary: Here’s why you should get into naturism as early as possible and not delay until you’re older.

It seems reasonable to assume that most people who read this blog regularly, or even only occasionally, have at least some interest in naturism or curiosity about it. But there are at least two types of readers. Some have more than occasionally enjoyed nudity at home or participated in social nudity. But others have little or no actual experience with either home or social nudity.

This series of posts may be of interest to people of both types. Those in the first category probably want to learn how to persuade others – such as friends or family members – to join them in naturist activities. Or else they’re enthusiastic naturists wanting to promote naturism to anyone who’s open-minded. On the other hand, people in the second category are still uncertain about whether they would actually enjoy naturism or whether it might be risky to participate in it.

In either case, it makes good sense to be clear about what the benefits of naturism are. Having a clear idea about these benefits is important whether the objective is to persuade others to try naturism or else to persuade oneself about that.
Continue reading “How to get started in naturism if you’re under 30, part 2: the good things about naturism”

New Meetup group: Naturists in the Modesto Area

After years of naturist participation and blogging, I’m in the process of organizing a naturist Meetup group for the Modesto, California area. (Think of the area as within about 100 miles of the city.) If you’re in the area and interested, go to

https://www.meetup.com/naturists-in-the-modesto-area

to learn more and request to join. (You’ll need to get a Meetup.com account if you don’t already have one.)

Here is the current description of the group:

Our group is for anyone who enjoys non-sexual social nudity. We’ll have clothing-optional activities to interest almost any naturist, such as visits to naturist clubs, home parties, potluck meals and picnics, swimming pool gatherings, camping, hiking, visits to nude beaches, online video chats, community outreach, and any other traditional naturist activity.

If you currently enjoy nudity mainly at home, this is an opportunity to find others like yourself. First-timers and anyone sincerely interested in naturism is welcome. All activities will be appropriate for your whole family, even those who aren’t quite ready to participate fully clothesfree.

In a Meetup group there’s the opportunity for members to communicate among themselves in a discussion area on the site, on a mailing list, and by private messaging with other members. If you already have naturist friends, this could be a good way to stay in touch with each other. So if you choose to join, please invite other nearby naturists you know to consider joining too.

Note that Modesto is about 60 miles from Laguna del Sol, easily the best naturist destination in the area, perhaps even in Northern California. It should be an ideal place for occasional organized events, or simply for group members to get together in smaller groups in a clothesfree environment.

If you have further questions before joining at Meetup, feel free to ask them in the comments here.

What sorts of things do you especially enjoy doing naked?

Since this is a naturist blog, I mean only non-sexual things, of course.

Dan Carlson’s blog very recently had a most interesting post: What Kind of Nudist are YOU? As phrased, the question suggests that “nudists” (and equivalently, “naturists”) tend to belong to distinct “kinds”, “types”, or “categories”.

Dan backs away from that sort of interpretation, yet he still offers 11 different categories to which he asks readers to assign themselves, although multiple categories are allowed. The categories are given snarky names, like “Jello-shot nudie crowd”, “Wine-foodie naturist snob”, “Life until death nudist”, and “Yoga-wellness guru”. Seriously, how many people who enjoy nudity would care to be regarded as members of categories like that? You’ll have to read the article for an explanation of how the categories are defined.
Continue reading “What sorts of things do you especially enjoy doing naked?”

What are your naturist goals?

Perhaps the notion of “naturist goals” immediately starts you wondering why naturists even need goals. Isn’t naturism supposed to be about simple pleasure and relaxation? Why would a naturist need to have “goals” – which would require planning and exerting some effort instead of simply enjoying any time that can be spent naked?

And the truth is: no, it isn’t absolutely necessary to set goals for yourself, as far as naturism is concerned. If you’re fully satisfied with being naked at home or when you visit a favorite naturist place, that fine. Enjoy it without reservation. Perhaps you don’t need to read any further.

On the other hand, you might want at least to consider why setting goals could allow you to enjoy naturism even more fully, more often, and in new and different ways.
Continue reading “What are your naturist goals?”

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, August 16-31, 2020


  1. Irish naturism

    There seems to be quite a bit of naturist activity in Ireland recently. Here are some examples. All this publicity probably isn’t coincidental. More likely it can be attributed to (successful) efforts by the Irish Naturist Association (INA) to call attention to naturism in their country.

    • Naturists in Ireland want to be connected to each other now more than ever
      A reporter from the Irish Post and Independent joined a group of local naturists on White Rock Beach in Dalkey, south of Dublin. She wanted to learn why interest in naturism in Ireland appears to be increasing significantly in spite of the pandemic. The INA claims a 31% increase in new members between May and July. It’s speculated that the pandemic is behind the increase, since people interested in naturism have time on their hands and want activities that can be enjoyed safely (and nakedly) in the outdoors.

    • Coastal Bodies Tour 2020


      According to artist Ciara Patricia Langan, “The Coastal Bodies Tour started in 2019 as a response to an awareness of a problem within Irish society on how we feel about our naked body. The tour aims to document all coastal counties of the Island of Ireland. These photographs will be populated by adults of all shapes and sizes, representing inclusions and showcasing the diversity of human form.” Langan goes on to add that “Shedding the unwanted shame attached to nudity by shedding one’s clothing as participatory art in a controlled environment can liberate and amplify one’s own sense of freedom.”

    • Naturists invited to participate in nude photoshoot on Co Kerry beach this weekend
      This is a report on an outing planned by Ciara Langan for her project “to document a modern Ireland that embraces pro-social nudity and champions body positivity.” Langan described the project as “the perfect way to celebrate our beautiful bodies, every shape and colour and size, in outdoor gatherings.”

      For previous recent reports on naturism in Ireland, see here, here, and here.


  2. Searching for the Threads of a Family Naturist Network


    The U. S. has some not-so-bad naturist resorts. But even many of the best hardly compare with what can be found in European countries, such as France, Spain, and Croatia. Especially when rated on their appeal to naturist families. Why is that? Read blogger Dan Carlson’s article for an extended discussion.

    There are observable facts that provide some answers. But underlying that, a significant part of the problem is in the attitudes and value system of most people in the U. S. – which is decidedly slanted to assume that children and naturism should not mix, and needs to move toward
    A value system with less paranoia about breast-feeding and nudity on TV. A value system that allows the average worker more than five vacation days a year. A value system where people don’t freak out when talking to their children about nudity and sex, and use real words like penis, breast, and vagina instead of amassing so much anatomy into the mysterious region of “private parts.”

    The first way that values in the U. S. need to change is for nudity to become normal and routine in more homes. It’s not necessary for family members to be naked much of the time, but nudity shouldn’t be discouraged either. Let everyone enjoy being naked as much as is practical and comfortable for them. Children shouldn’t get the idea that certain body parts must be covered at all times. Until home nudity is normalized, naturism will continue to be crippled.

    Beyond that, the value system in general should renounce the mistaken idea that nudity must not be allowed where children might see it – especially in the most popular and widely-used social media. Never mind that almost any 10-year old can easily find raunchy porn. That, of course, is how they’re likely to satisfy their sexual curiosity, given that many U. S. states don’t allow sex ed in public schools unless it’s of the mostly useless and abstinence-only sort. How could tolerance of nudity at home and visits to naturist places not be a healthy way for parents to answer their kids’ questions about the “facts of life”?

  3. Nude Hiking in the Alps


    The Naked European Walking Tour (NEWT) is an annual event that’s been held since 2005. It “usually involves a week of naked hiking somewhere in the alpine mountains.” In most years, participants can choose either to bring their own tents or (for the less hardy) to stay in pre-arranged mountain resorts and huts. But in this case each day’s hike started and ended at a large Austrian guest chalet.

    The tours were the idea of Richard Foley, editor/author of the excellent book Naked Hiking and creator of the Naktiv website. Extensive text and photographic records of previous NEWT events can be found on the NEWT page.

    The report of the 2020 event (in the link above) relates that 30 men and 10 women participated. Their nationalities were mostly European: Irish, English, French, German, Dutch, Swiss, and Slovakian. The weather was mixed, with the first two days being too wet for hiking. Although the third day was dry, it was cold, so only an hour and a half was suitable for naked hiking. The last two days, however, were good for clothesfree hiking. The hikes involved as much as 10 miles of walking and elevation gains of up to 2300 feet, so being naked helped avoid overheating. Many members of the general public were encountered during the hikes, yet they “in general paid no attention to the fact that the forty of us were naked.” U. S. naturist should be very envious.


  4. In a Naked Pandemic Race, You Can Leave Your Hat On


    Jen A. Miller, who writes a weekly letter on running for the New York Times, isn’t a naturist. But here she writes about her first run in a 5K race, where she, the runners, and the spectators were naked. The fact that most other races (of the clothed sort) had been canceled because of the pandemic was certainly a factor in doing this. And she hesitated, not because of the nudity per se, but simply because the idea of running naked “seemed so — uncomfortable.”

    Nevertheless, she enjoyed the race, and in fact she finished “good enough for fifth place in my category. My award: a medal that I wore at [sic] around my neck with nothing but my sandals, bandanna and a fresh coating of sun block.” As far as the nudity of others was concerned, “With a full view of their entire, naked forms in motion, I felt appreciation, in the same way I’d look at a nice painting.”


  5. Nudity is not a perversion. The mind makes it so


    Yoga teacher Luna Phoenix has been teaching co-ed nude yoga for over 8 years. She wants to assure everyone interested in yoga that learning and practicing it naked is not a sexual thing. Naturists, of course, won’t be surprised at that. Yoga is just one of many things that are significantly enhanced when done naked – without any sexual connection.

    In Sanskrit, yoga practiced devoid of clothing is termed Nagna Yoga. “Nagna” is a cognate (i. e, born from the same source) of the English “naked”. This ancient concept is referred to by very similar words in other (northern) Indo-European languages like Swedish (naken), German (nackt), and Polish (nagi).

    Luna writes:
    In our practice, we start with an “unmasking ceremony”. In the “Unmasking Ceremony”, we remove our clothing in two parts as in layers to unveil the third mask of ours, (the TRUE SELF). We use the clothing as a symbol of the masks we place on ourselves to function with our responsibilities in the different circles we participate in. This ceremony allows you to go through a transition to alleviate any anxieties one may have to practicing Nagna Yoga. Stripping ourselves from the clothing allows us to uncover the masks so we may discover who we truly are.

    This is an excellent statement of the philosophical grounding of naturism. It’s not entirely about the world of “nature” – of which humans are a part – but also about the essential “nature” of every person, which isn’t obscured, disguised, or concealed beneath extraneous, “unnatural” clothing. For naturists, you are most yourself when you dispense entirely with clothes.

  6. Women and nudity

    Mainstream publications, unsurprisingly, seem to assume that most women avoid being seen naked by nearly everyone, due simply to socially-instilled “modesty” or else genuine worries about the appearance of their naked body or inviting unwanted sexual attention. Any or all of these factors deter most women from an interest in naturism. But there are rewards for those who can overcome these concerns.

    However, in fact, most benefits of nakedness that are cited often apply just as much to men as to women. Many men have body acceptance issues. And they’re also fully able to appreciate the many psychological benefits of wearing nothing that are mentioned by the women here.

    • Meet the women who say baring all is a natural stress-buster that lets them shed their worries… along with their inhibitions
      This article points out so many positives about nudity it could be an excellent advertisement for naturism. Seven women attest to the value of nudity – for a variety of different, but quite legitimate, reasons. Certain themes are often mentioned: freedom, comfort, relaxation, empowerment, stress relief, emotional healing, and body acceptance.

      • TV presenter Ulrika Jonsson says that nudity has “the ultimate feelgood factor”. For her, nudity is relaxing, de-stressing, and it can be “be a healing experience”.
      • Model Cara Delevingne “turns to nakedness whenever she is feeling upset or overwhelmed”.
      • Relationship and sexuality coach Emma Spiegler says that removing clothes “is incredibly empowering”, since being “totally naked takes a lot of courage”.
      • Administrative assistant Clare Clark “was brought up to be comfortable in my skin” and “was very at ease with my body growing into adulthood”. She realized that “perfect bodies” were unreal and not worth comparing oneself with. From visiting nude beaches, she found they were “a safer environment for women” and people there were uncritical of others’ bodies because “naturists are very accepting”. She now believes “removing your clothes is the ultimate stress reliever and the best form of mindfulness”.
      • Musician Jess Maison grew up with parents “who are very liberated about nakedness”. From them she learned “to be proud of my body and not be prudish when it comes to my naked form”. She’s now “happiest in her skin when she is nude”. She now likes “to be naked at outdoor settings as much as possible”. Especially at “festivals where you can be naked. There is no sexual element. It’s purely about enjoying the freedom.”
      • Sports facility manager Rosi Lee believes that “being naked in the company of other people is a great leveller and allows people to be open and themselves as they have nothing to hide.” She especially enjoys social nudity because “being naked with other people on the same wavelength is reassuring and comforting.” Besides that, there’s “nothing more relaxing than feeling the warm sun on your naked skin.”
      • Executive assistant Maria Morris especially enjoys naked yoga, because it “makes me feel alive”. Furthermore, “I am at my calmest in the woods sitting cross-legged, breathing deeply, eyes shut — and naked.” Nudity goes very well with yoga, since “certain poses are easier when naked”. She cites many benefits from naked yoga, including “it releases so much stress”, “it makes me feel empowered and in control”, it “lets me recharge”. Most of all “it’s so liberating to be able to do yoga without anything on. I love it as it’s a brief moment in life where I feel truly free.”

    • Naturist Victoria Vantage says her nude videos lead to proposals from fans of her bottom
      Here’s an article about one naturist woman that’s a lot more what’s to be expected from a British tabloid like The Sun. Nevertheless, all but an obvious few points are much the same as in the previous article.

      Victoria Vantage is a naturist and registered nurse. She says she discovered naturism when she volunteered to model nude for a life drawing class while at her university. In addition to continuing to model for art classes, she has made nudity a significant part of her life – doing “most household tasks naked” and also hiking and bicycling “in the buff”.

      And why not? Being naked when doing chores makes them feel less tedious – and enhances the enjoyment of more pleasurable activities.

  7. Three cyclonudists in France in September?


    Although most WNBR events were called off this year on account of the pandemic, this report from Brazil’s Os Naturistas indicates that 3 are still on the calendar for Septimber in the French cities of Rennes, Lyon and Paris. (“Cyclonudista” is apparently another term for WNBR used in some places.)

Naturist New Year’s resolutions

Sure, you may already have a list of resolutions for the new year – which, if things go as usual, you may not manage to fully keep. So having more suggestions might not be what you were hoping for. However, since you’re a naturist, or at least may have seriously considered becoming one, there are some important resolutions you should consider adding to the list.

If you’re curious enough about naturism to be reading a blog like this, one of the most important things you could be thinking about for the coming year is how to spend a lot more time being naked. So if it would help to keep things simple, here’s the single resolution that should go on your list:

This year I’m going to step up my involvement in naturist activities.

Continue reading “Naturist New Year’s resolutions”

Are there many people who enjoy nudity at home but don’t visit nude beaches and resorts?

Naturism is often thought of as enjoying nudity in the presence of others (not in one’s immediate family) by sunbathing and skinny-dipping at clothing-optional beaches, being naked while hiking or camping in remote places, visiting naturist campgrounds and resorts near where one lives, or traveling (for those who can afford it) to well-known large-scale naturist facilities in countries like France, Spain, or Croatia. That’s certainly what most national and regional naturist organizations have usually promoted (sometimes under the label of “nude recreation”) – at least before Covid-19 arrived.

But what about enjoying frequent nudity right in one’s own home and back yard? Haven’t significant numbers of people been doing that for decades, even before the pandemic? Isn’t that just as much “real” naturism too – and possibly something enjoyed by far more people?
Continue reading “Are there many people who enjoy nudity at home but don’t visit nude beaches and resorts?”

How to enjoy nudity at home if you live with people who aren’t accustomed to nudity

The first step in “normalizing nudity” is to spend as much time as possible naked at home. The people you live with are usually the most important people who need to be comfortable with your nudity. If anyone you live with isn’t comfortable with even the idea that you might be naked at home, then you may have to be secretive about it with them, at least initially. That’s often difficult and not really a good idea for a number of reasons. Perhaps the most important reason is that you’ll be constrained on when and where you can be naked – and you’ll always be afraid they’ll find out you enjoy nudity. You may even feel that what you are doing is “wrong” or “shameful” – which will certainly cripple your enjoyment of nudity.
Continue reading “How to enjoy nudity at home if you live with people who aren’t accustomed to nudity”