The fourth issue of Revitalizing Naturism has just been published

Let’s look at two different approaches to promoting naturism and which of the two is probably more effective. The more effective approach involves individual naturists working with each other to explain naturism to others in their social networks.

You can subscribe to the newsletter here (It’s free!), or read just the latest issue here.

Newsworthy nudity, 2022-1

  1. Naked Dressing Has You Covered (10/23/22)

    According to the New York Times, this is what some assertively chic women may be wearing come Spring 2023. One quoted source said, “It’s just about the body. It’s about, I have the right to expose myself the way I want to.” At least, that’s what “fashion” designers are claiming. Another source says, “the way we play with sex appeal is not trying to be body-enhancing. It’s about being in control of your identity.” Close to what naturists have been saying all along, right? There’s almost no good reason that any part of the body must be hidden.

    About this “new naked dressing” the article’s writer maintains that “exposure does not equate to vulnerability but strength and that the body just as it is is just fine.” As naturists will wholeheartedly agree. “The point of the new nakedness,” yet another source observes, “is not to provide that sort of viewing pleasure [for others] but rather a form of self-pleasure.”

    Certain women may choose to wear something that exposes just a bit short of everything. Such minimal clothing is merely decoration – like tattoos, jewelry, or other accessories that conceal little. Women at naturist places, in fact, often make a similar choice – and that’s fine. What’s the reason? It’s about “control of identity”. In many contexts, such as business and professional settings, women traditionally have much more freedom of choice than men about the colors, styles, etc. of what they wear. So selecting one of these “almost but not entirely naked” fashions to make a unique statement of who they are is understandable. (Supposedly, some women are upset if another woman present is wearing a nearly identical outfit, as that could suggest it was mass-produced in some Asian sweatshop and there’s nothing special about it.)

    But before you get carried away with thinking there might be a trend toward wearing a “bare” minimum, consider the reality. It’s a “trend” only for relatively few women. This is “fashion” or “style” in limited circumstances, such as social occasions where distinctiveness matters. You won’t see anything like this while shopping at Walmart.

  2. A Bold New Plan For A Bold New Age Of Nudism (1/14/22)

    That AANR has a “bold new plan” is great. Basically, the plan is for more effective advertising. That’s fine – as far as it goes. But it’s a top-down approach. In other words, AANR hopes to stimulate awareness of and interest in naturism through advertising. But whether that should be the main approach is debatable. Many studies of how ideas are transmitted show that person-to-person communication is much more effective than advertising. Wouldn’t you be much more likely to seriously consider an idea that someone you know and trust passed along than an advertisement you saw somewhere? An advertisement that makes claims without trustworthy information to back them up?

    An effective plan to promote naturism needs to include a bottom-up approach. That would mean encouraging people who are already enthusiastic naturists to explain what is so great about naturism to open-minded friends – along with an invitation to try it themselves with someone they respect and trust. This is a “grassroots” strategy that can be effective if millions of current naturists are encouraged to do what they can to promote naturism.

    And it’s way past time for AANR to ditch the terms “nudism” and “nudist”. They’re really outdated, as well as having risible connotations to most people. The terms “naturism” and “naturist” are what’s used in reference to social nudity in most countries other than the U.S. Disagree? Well, think about how chosen terminology affects other people, rather than what you might personally prefer.

  3. Life in the buff (9/23/22)

    This article by Annebella Pollen, a professor of visual and material culture, deals with the history of nude photography, mainly involving naturists in Britain since the 1920s. Ms. Pollen herself has published a book, Nudism in A Cold Climate on the subject. (I haven’t yet had the opportunity to check it out, but I hope to soon.) In the early days, photography of naturists in the flesh – often female and as explicit as could be allowed – was intended to promote naturism in a healthy way. Perhaps inevitably, such photography became used as soft porn by non-naturists decades before explicit nude photos (pornish or otherwise) could legally be sold.

    Simply as an overview of early naturism in Britain, apart from photography, there are a few interesting details. One is the point that early naturism in Britain (as well as Germany and France) was meant to be a lifestyle that promoted healthy living, physical fitness, and the body type that would result. For better or worse, naturists now emphasize that “all bodies are good bodies”. Another interesting detail is that “By the end of the 1930s, nudist membership was at an all-time high in Britain, with around 40,000 members.” That compares very favorably with the peak membership of AANR in the U.S. in 2000 – around 65,000 – even though Britain’s population in 1940 was about 13% of the U.S. population in 2000.

  4. Bare with us: why naturism in Britain is booming (8/7/22)

    Fast forward from British naturism in 1940 to the present day. The article here is from The Guardian, by far Britains’s most respectable news source, rather than from the official British Naturism organization. It’s likely accurate (as a survey reported in the next article indicates). A reason for the assertion is probably in the initial blurb: “One of the unexpected results of the pandemic has been the rise of nudism – so much so that British Naturism is experiencing the fastest growth in new members in 100 years” (roughly the entire history of naturism in the UK). But that, by itself, is hardly the only reason. A very important factor is that – unlike either U.S. naturist organization – BN has long provided enjoyable naturist activities directly to its members. And that’s in spite of the fact that the British climate is notably less benign than in (at least) the more southerly parts of the U.S.

    Especially during the pandemic, BN offered its members a number of activities via Zoom – yoga and exercise sessions, online group chats, cooking lessons, etc. But before the pandemic, and now that it’s mostly abated, BN has offered a wide range of both online and in-person activities. The continuing online choices include discussion forums, blogs, book groups, and member picture galleries. The in-person activities are numerous too – organized swim sessions at local pools, regional festivals and gatherings, and events to support charities, including Great British Skinny Dips at many beaches. Neither U.S. national naturist organization offers any comparable smorgasbord of naturist activities. Even AANR’s “Bold New Plan” certainly involves nothing at all similar.

  5. 6.75 million Naturists in the UK (10/15/22)

    The evidence, alluded to just above, for how naturism is “booming” in Britain is from a poll that BN recently commissioned from the Ipsos public opinion firm. The result: “14% (equating to 6.75 million adults) of people in the UK describe themselves as Naturists or Nudists”. That compares to a similar 2011 poll that gave a result of 3.7 million adults (6%) – which was still pretty good. That’s nearly a double in 11 years. 14% of the current U.S. adult population is about 29 million. There’s no way that many U.S. people would describe themselves as naturists or nudists. Or even participate in naturist activities, regardless of how they describe themselves. If that total were even in the same ballpark, U.S. naturist clubs and resorts would be doing a “booming” business, with an average of something like 100,000 different visitors each year.

    Some other findings of the recent British poll:

    • 21% of respondents say they’ve skinny-dipped at some time in their life.
    • 39% of adults have participated in some type of nude recreation, like skinny dipping, sunbathing, or visiting a naturist beach.
    • 22% of respondents have been naked in the presence of others (including by video) at least once in the past year.
    • 47% of young people (age from 16 to 44) have participated in a naturist activity at least once in the past year, compared to just 6% of respondents in the 45-75 age range.


    U.S. naturists should be so jealous.

  6. Nearly 7m people in UK identify as naturists or nudists, survey suggests (10/15/22)

    The Guardian considered the results of the BN poll to be sufficiently newsworthy to report in a prominent article. In fact, a similar poll was done in 2001, with only 2% ot the population identifying as naturists. So the percentage tripled in 10 years! The increase almost certainly isn’t an error or due simply to faulty polling. In contrast, between 2001 and now AANR’s membership has dropped by more than half. It’s pretty clear which of BN or AANR is the more effective organization. BN modestly suggests that the result for naturism in Britain is because “more people are discovering the benefits that nudity brings to mental, emotional and physical health”. But it’s likely most of those people didn’t discover it by themselves without any help from an active naturist organization providing opportunities to experience social nudity in person.

    The article placed some emphasis on how many young people in Britain have taken to naturism – so that almost half of newly active naturists in the UK were in the youngest category: 16 to 24 years of age, compared to only 6% in the 45-75 year range. (All the rest were 25 to 44.) The survey from 10 years ago found nearly an even split between the oldest and youngest groups of new naturists. Whatever the reason, BN seems to have found a way to appeal to people who may remain naturists for at least another half-century. To drive home the point, a new naturist, Katy, who’s 17, was quoted saying “A group of us went swimming in the lakes over the summer and decided on the spur of the moment, to take off our costumes. Then we just hung out afterwards, not bothering to get dressed. I realised it was so freeing.”

  7. HALF of young British adults identify as naturists or nudists: Poll reveals surge in 16 to 24-year-olds enjoying activities without wearing clothes (10/15/22)

    Here’s a little more about the young British naturists between 16 and 24 years of age. It’s from The Daily Mail, one of many British tabloids. As such, it’s certainly no peer of The Guardian. In particular, the headline mistakenly states that half of all young Brits in that age group are naturists. In fact, as noted above, what’s actually correct is that half of new naturists are in that age group. Still, as BN President Dr Mark Bass said, “Younger people are diving into it far more than their elders have done. That gives us a lot of confidence in the future.”

    Despite the editorial blunder, the British reality should be very interesting for U.S. naturists, as (unfortunately) in the U.S. rather few young adults participate in naturism. Apparently, they think it’s somehow “uncool” and only for people middle-aged or older. Young British naturists thoroughly debunk that idea. It seems to be true that people who “belong” to a particular generation (“Gen Z” in this case) mostly pay attention only to what their generational peers think. That’s a good thing for naturists in Britain – but not good at all in the U.S. Precisely because of the great misconception the youngest U.S. adults avoid participation in naturism. It’s a vicious circle. C’est la vie.

  8. How naked festival Nudefest FINALLY made me feel comfortable in my own skin

    Here’s a fine example of what BN does to attract new people to naturism. They don’t just put up ads promoting naturism, no matter how enticing. What’s far more persuasive is actual, positive, clothes-off experiences with naturism. People who’re at all curious about naturism need to be surrounded by naked naturists having a great time. And better still if they get naked themselves. BN’s flagship summer naturist festival is called Nudefest.

    Antonia, who works for the Daily Mail, was asked by her employer if she “fancied reporting from Nudefest”. “I said yes before I could change my mind, or think it through,” she replied. Her explanation: “Since stopping drinking to improve my health in January, I have tried to push my comfort boundaries, to prove that giving up alcohol need not make life dull.” Nevertheless, she still approached the experience with much trepidation, but determined not to flinch from a resolve to get naked from the start.

    One of the first people she speoke with explains, “Some people think we are ridiculous, dangerous even, but the truth is that everyone who gets into this environment changes their view, because it’s so normal when everyone’s naked.” Knowing how common such negative assumptions are among non-naturists, it’s reassuring to first-timers that the truth is how normal being naked with others actually feels. Unfortunately, persuading doubters about the reality is usually difficult.

    After having spoken with first-timers whose initial anxieties were like her own, Antonia reports, “The longer I’m naked for, the more normal it seems, and by the time I’m watching a naked circus performer on stage, his genitals twirling as enthusiastically as the giant hoop he’s in, I often forget I’m naked at all.” This process is exactly what’s necessary, in most cases, to persuade others that engaging in naturist activities (whether or not one starts to self-identify as a naturist) is something they need in their lives. It’s just the Confucian saying: “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.” This is why simply advertising the goodness of naturism usually doesn’t work.

  9. Naturists cast off their clothes and all their worries on the beach (8/14/22)

    Although most of the foregoing is about naturism in Britain, it’s encouraging that Britain’s next-door neighbor, Ireland, has recently begun to have enthusiastic naturists too, despite being predominantly Roman Catholic. In this article, Leticia Medina, president of the Irish Naturist Association, affirms that naturism “is not linked to sex in public. It is not voyeurism, or exhibitionism. It is about being natural in a non-judgemental environment. Nothing sexual happens here. It’s just naked people on a beach… It’s about body equality. It’s about body confidence, and creating an environment for positive aging. You feel free.”

    Just like BN, the fledgling INA “saw its numbers swell during the pandemic. As well as beach meet-ups, they embark on naked yoga, hiking and trips overseas to parts of Europe, often to visit saunas. They also rent swimming pools and saunas in Ireland for private naturist sessions.” The Irish law on nudity is just like Britain’s: “Being naked in public is not a criminal offence, unless people are “causing alarm” to other members of the public or there is a sexual threat displayed.” And, Medina notes, “We have had very little opposition from anyone”. The organization has also had private naked tours to art galleries running exhibitions displaying naked art.

  10. I Raised My Kids On A Nude Beach — And I’d Do It Again In A Heartbeat (9/14/22)

    Public opinion in the U.S. generally considers any involvement of children in naturist activities before puberty to be inherently dangerous and likely harmful to young minds, especially the youngest. They might learn things that their adults don’t want them to know! That’s crazy, of course. In this article Nadine Robinson, a Canadian naturist mother of four daughters, shares her feelings about children and nudity – emphasizing especially the value of learning in detail what real bodies are like. As a practicing midwife, when her children ranged in age from 4 to 11 she has no qualms talking with then about pubic hair, placentas, and what the clitoris is. Plainly, going to a nude beach and getting naked among many naked others wasn’t a problem at all.

    Nadine had been going to nude beaches since she “first discovered them at the age of 16, when I snuck away from my parents on a family vacation in Hawaii. I loved the freedom of being naked in the waves, and I couldn’t believe how confident I felt.” One of her reason for taking the children to a nude beach was to “help immunize them from the cultural idea that women’s bodies exist for men’s viewing pleasure.” She believes that “mainstream media gives women a dangerously narrow definition of what is beautiful. I was much more terrified that my children would internalize an unrealistic image of women’s bodies”.

    She says her “kids loved their first experience at the naked beach. They were comfortable, confident, and it really demystified nudity. Every summer after that they visited the naked beach. They’re all now adults. Each of them “has had their own relationship with nudity over the years. Sometimes they went completely naked, other times they stayed clothed, honoring their personal comfort as they moved through life stages.” If only many more mothers were like Nadine there would be far fewer women who are overly anxious about their bodies – and unable to even understand naturism and what’s so great about it.

Bonus from earlier: You Should Get Naked More Often. It’s Good for You. (7/21/16)

The third issue of Revitalizing Naturism has just been published

This issue takes a deep dive into some of the many reasons that naturism seems to have lost popularity in the U.S. in the past 2 or 3 decades. Understanding these reasons is the first step towards taking action to counteract them.

You can subscribe to the newsletter here (It’s free!), or read just the latest issue here.

A new issue of Revitalizing Naturism has just been published

The issue is about what may be the main challenge facing naturism today. That is: why and how to stop being secretive about having an interest in naturism or social nudity. That will help correct the misunderstandings people you know have about naturism. Not only the people you discuss naturism with will know of your interest. But (with your permission) they will be able to tell their own acquaintances what you’ve told them. That can help you develop a network of naturist friends. Both you and naturism in general benefit the more people give it a try.

You can subscribe to the newsletter here, or read just the latest issue here.

New newsletter from Naturistplace: Revitalizing Naturism

There’s a specific purpose for this newsletter. It’s not a replacement for the blog, but instead is intended for the purpose indicated in the title. Since it needs to be read by as many naturists as possible, I intend it will always be free.

Here’s a brief summary of the purpose:

At the present time, naturism in the U.S. and around the world is facing some serious challenges. This newsletter will try to explain the issues and welcome a dialog with readers about how to deal with the challenges, revitalize naturism, and strengthen it for the future.

Please use the following link to subscribe:

If you have any questions before subscribing, just ask in the comments.

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, December 1-15, 2020

  1. We Hosted Our Own Naked Party: Here’s What Happened

    Most people understand the idea of “do it yourself”. Whenever you need something done, there are basically two options: pay someone else to do it, or… do it yourself. Your car needs some repairs, you need to update a room in your house to meet your needs, you need to prepare food for a party for 20 people, your child needs extra help in school with math, you’d like to start a vegetable garden to grow some of your own food… Or whatever. Each of these tasks requires at least certain minimal skills or experience – which you may not currently have.

    But there are problems with hiring someone else to take on such things. You’ll have to pay them. They won’t do the job to your satisfaction or not do quite what you had in mind. You might not even be able to find someone suitable for doing the work.

    Naturists encounter this dilemma – a lot. Naturist resorts you’d like to visit in order to socialize with other naturists are either too far away, have limited facilities, are in a dilapidated state, or don’t attract the sort of people you’d like to meet. Non-landed clubs you might consider joining are poorly run, have only boring activities, or seldom have many activities at all.

    What’s the solution? Do it yourself! In this case, you can hold your own parties and events for naturists you know or others you know who might like to learn about naturism from people they trust (i. e., you). The article here gives good advice about how to do it. Almost no special skills are usually required. And not much experience either. If you’ve been a naturist for a least a little while, you probably have all of the necessary experience, because you know what naturists expect and enjoy. As for skills, go with what you already have. Probably some ability at food planning and preparation. Some knowledge of activities other naturists would enjoy. And enough social skills to ensure people have a good time.

    You don’t need to depend on “organized” naturism to provide what you want. You can do it yourself. And here’s an earlier post about naturist parties: What individual naturists could do to promote naturism – and why

  2. Free Beaches Make Dollars and Sense

    Here’s a very slickly-produced short (about 5½ min.) video that clearly explains why states and communities adjacent to good beaches – and their local businesses – can experience significant extra income from the establishment of clothing-optional sections of the beaches.

    This video is from the Tampa Bay Free Beaches organization. They’re working to have a legal clothing-optional beach on the west coast of Florida. Florida’s east coast already has four such beaches, including the very popular Haulover Beach near Miami. (That link is from a tourist site, and here’s another from the same organization on clothing-optional beaches in Florida.) Yet the west coast doesn’t have any legal clothing-optional beaches, even though there are many naturist parks and resorts near Tampa (mainly in Pasco County).

    But such naturist places can’t have the economic impact of a clothing-optional beach. There are several reasons for this. One is that many of these places have large populations of full-time (naturist) residents. But these residents don’t contribute more to the local economy than any other local residents. Tourists, on the other hand, mostly aren’t naturists, but they do visit clothing-optional beaches and spend lots of money in the area. Most importantly, they vastly outnumber local naturists.

    Many people don’t care to live in Florida full-time, for various reasons. Yet Florida is a very popular tourist destination for many reasons, including a warm climate and numerous tourist attractions and theme parks. Visitors to any of these attractions may also be interested in clothing-optional beaches, which are quite scarce in other parts of the country. Many visitors also arrive not only from the U. S. itself but from all over the world – including countries where naturism is popular.

    It’s not necessary to say more about the economic importance of clothing-optional beaches here, as this post goes into considerable detail on the subject. And here’s a post from November 2020 with similar information on the newest clothing-optional beach on Florida’s east coast: Blind Creek Beach, near Fort Pierce. Diligent work of the Treasure Coast Naturists group made it possible.

  3. Woman posing naked outside museum wins ‘Best Bum 2020’ contest after Cambridge uni students bared all


    Obviously, this article is just clickbait for the tabloid’s site. But it does illustrate a fairly recent and interesting trend. Namely, fully naked butts are no longer considered “obscene” or unfit for “decent” people to see (although they’re probably NSFW). Facebook and its ilk agree, despite rabid hostility to frontal nudity. Not so long ago, a person’s butt crack in pictures like this would be heavily blurred, pixellated, or strategically covered by an emoticon or black bar.

    There’s more to this story than simply how it’s presented in certain British media. It shows that, at least in England, college students are willing to pose naked for amusing and playful – yet tasteful – photos. Nothing basically wrong with that.

  4. Pro surfer who has tackled some of the world’s largest waves goes on a NUDE surfing trip


    This story in a different British tabloid doesn’t make fun of nudity, yet some of the language it uses (“intimate”, “completely naked”, “bold display”, “incredible”) makes quite clear the tabloid’s attitude towards nudity. Clearly, too, the story is aimed at lower-class Brits in the way it (sometimes, not consistently) uses black bars to obscure what that type of person considers “naughty” to depict.

    However, the photos themselves (from a “three year audio-visual project”) are quite tasteful and striking. There’s also a short (and heavily censored) clip from a 4-minute short documentary called “Skin Deep”. The pro surfer and artist (Felicity Palmateer) wanted to combine “her passions of art and surfing in a bold display of self expression” Oddly, however, although the documentary was very artistic and aimed to show “self expression” it was felt necessary that “The filming sessions for Skin Deep had to be carefully curated so that Ms Palmateer could comfortably surf while in secrecy”. It’s sad that such beautiful imagery was treated as if it were simply porn.

  5. Growing interest in naturism since first lockdown

    Here’s an interesting story about naturism in a local Irish newspaper. Several points stand out. The first, and perhaps the most important, is that the report takes naturism seriously. That contrasts markedly with how naturism is treated in the U. S. (or even in British tabloids). There’s no intimation that there’s anything weird, peculiar, or abnormal about someone who enjoys being naked (in suitable circumstances). Second, the person who was interviewed (Michael) emphasizes that when someone has become used to being naked, it feels entirely normal and unremarkable not to wear anything as long as nobody objects – and more comfortable than wearing clothes. Third, naturism is becoming more popular and acceptable in Ireland, in contrast with the fairly recent past.

Naturists seriously need local naturist organizations

Naturism in the U. S. is not doing well, especially in comparison to how it is in western European countries, such as France, Spain, Germany, England, and even Croatia. Much of the problem is due to outdated cultural attitudes towards nudity. These bad attitudes, however, are not being adequately countered by U. S. naturists and their organizations. Consequently, many if not most naturists feel they have to be secretive about their enjoyment of nudity. And that secrecy, in turn, prevents naturism from thriving as it should.

What follows is an examination of the problem – and what could be done to deal effectively with it.
Continue reading “Naturists seriously need local naturist organizations”

New Meetup group: Naturists in the Modesto Area

After years of naturist participation and blogging, I’m in the process of organizing a naturist Meetup group for the Modesto, California area. (Think of the area as within about 100 miles of the city.) If you’re in the area and interested, go to

https://www.meetup.com/naturists-in-the-modesto-area

to learn more and request to join. (You’ll need to get a Meetup.com account if you don’t already have one.)

Here is the current description of the group:

Our group is for anyone who enjoys non-sexual social nudity. We’ll have clothing-optional activities to interest almost any naturist, such as visits to naturist clubs, home parties, potluck meals and picnics, swimming pool gatherings, camping, hiking, visits to nude beaches, online video chats, community outreach, and any other traditional naturist activity.

If you currently enjoy nudity mainly at home, this is an opportunity to find others like yourself. First-timers and anyone sincerely interested in naturism is welcome. All activities will be appropriate for your whole family, even those who aren’t quite ready to participate fully clothesfree.

In a Meetup group there’s the opportunity for members to communicate among themselves in a discussion area on the site, on a mailing list, and by private messaging with other members. If you already have naturist friends, this could be a good way to stay in touch with each other. So if you choose to join, please invite other nearby naturists you know to consider joining too.

Note that Modesto is about 60 miles from Laguna del Sol, easily the best naturist destination in the area, perhaps even in Northern California. It should be an ideal place for occasional organized events, or simply for group members to get together in smaller groups in a clothesfree environment.

If you have further questions before joining at Meetup, feel free to ask them in the comments here.

Recent articles on nudity and naturism, September 16-30, 2020

  1. Skinny-dipping in Cornwall’s historic miners’ pools

    Cornwall is the southernmost county in England and a popular tourist destination for its scenic spots, historical associations, and beaches. More than a dozen of the beaches are clothing-optional (at least unofficially). There are lists here, here, and here. But the clothing-optional beaches aren’t the only places on the coast where skinny-dipping is possible. There are also a number of tidal pools, both natural and man-made. Some naturists may prefer them, as the water is clearer and they’re likely to allow for more privacy.

    The writer of the story one day met Laura, who prefers the pools for nude swims. As she explains, “Tidal pools, for me, offer peace and privacy. I’m drawn to off the beaten track swim spots that feel a world away from the crowds and, more often than not, you have the pool totally to yourself. On a choppy day they often offer a tranquil swimming spot alongside the sea so you don’t have to forgo a swim.”


  2. Children and nudity


    The issues of how much, if at all, it’s “healthy” for children to encounter adult nudity or even be naked themselves engender much controversy – especially in countries like the U. S.

    The issues arise especially in connection with family nudity in the home. In the state of Utah, one of the most backward states in the U. S., a judge actually ruled in January 2020 that a woman violated a state “lewdness” law simply for being topfree in her own home when children were around. See here for the details.

    On the other hand, in England some art teachers are making a good case why it’s beneficial for children to have art classes that include nude models. That’s reported on here.

    Now there are additional articles dealing with this issue.


    Recently, I offered some comments here on this article: Searching for the Threads of a Family Naturist Network about the fact that rather few U. S. families bring their children to naturist parks and resorts – especially compared to the situation in Europe. In order for this to change for the better, it will probably be necessary for nudity to become normal and routine in more homes. The article Eight Things to Know About Nudity and Your Family, (from Psychology Today) was recommended to support this view.

    Here are some earlier articles discussing similar issues:


    As you’ll see further down, the opinions regarding children and nudity of deeply ignorant people who know nothing about naturism, even in England, can be a major problem.


  3. Spencer Tunick – Alexandra Palace


    London’s Alexandra Palace, in spite of the name, was never a residence of royalty or a member of the nobility. It was opened in 1873 as a place serving the public for recreation, education, and entertainment. Many naturists will need no introduction to Spencer Tunick. But for anyone who’s unaware of his work, he has been directing and photographing about 100 “installations” involving nude volunteers in public places around the world. Installation are announced beforehand – and there are almost always more volunteers who apply to participate than can be chosen. His latest work involved 220 selected volunteers. Check out some of the numerous articles published online for details, pictures, and videos.


  4. Naturist attacked by angry mob


    For a number of years, British Naturism has hosted an event for members and their families at an elaborate waterpark, Waterworld, in Stoke-on-Trent, England. (See here.) In the last few years, anti-naturist extremists have protested the event, on the grounds that “their” children might be endangered by “pedophiles”. That’s nonsense to begin with, since only families of British Naturism members actually attend the event. But logic is a foreign concept to such extremists. BN, of course, does not allow any known pedophiles among its members, and would not tolerate any improper behavior by anyone at the event. Further details can be found in the news stories listed below.

    Similar events for British Naturism members and their families have been held elsewhere in England without this degree of harassment and threats. (Although family naturist swims in other countries such as the U. S. and Canada have encountered such problems.) So what happened in this case shows that even in England there are people as ignorant about and hostile to naturism as are more typical in North America.

    The following stories appeared before the event and provide general information about it.


    On September 26 the event went on as scheduled. Unfortunately, threats of harm to their business were made to the owners of Waterworld by the protesters before the event and during an unruly mob protest outside the event itself. So the owners decided that in the future children under 18 will not be allowed to attend future naturist events, as described in the following articles.

  5. Lockdown Doesn’t Mean Locked In


    With the arrival of vaccines for COVID-19 and the cautious, gradual relaxation of restrictions on social activities, there’s hope that more of a normal life will be possible in 2021. However, many people – especially naturists – have enjoyed the freedom of spending considerable time naked while confined to their own homes. So dispensing with clothes can become increasionly routine – even the norm – at least at home and elsewhere it’s possible.

    As this article points out, nudity is quite possible outdoors – even after social distancing is necessary – if one has a sufficiently private yard or access to natural places nearby where nudity is acceptable. In fact, it would be worthwhile to invest time in searching for outdoor places that can be enjoyed naked. If only to be prepared for the next pandemic to come along.


  6. Top 5 Fears of a Clothing Optional Resort

    This article has advice for anyone who’s new to naturism. It allays fears that anyone who’s had even a little experience with social nudity has easily overcome. What’s noteworthy is that this is on a site (gogirlfriend.com) that’s especially intended for women traveling alone or with a partner. Most naturists, even men, probably have had the same concerns before their first visit to a naturist place. (Note: The resort named “Desire Resorts” and recommended in the article is definitely not a naturist place. GoGirlfriend includes conventional naturist places, but also some places with a more sexual aspect.)

    The fears, specifically, are: (1) Clothing-optional resorts are for swingers; (2) Being naked around strangers will make you feel self-conscious; (3) Full nudity is always expected; (4) You will be hit on; (5) Anything goes. To be honest, there are some clothing-optional or (supposedly) naturist places where such fears could be justified to some extent. For a first-timer, it would certainly be prudent to read reviews at sites like Yelp or TripAdvisor of any destination being considered – especially for a woman traveling alone. GoGirlfriend itself should be checked, though it covers only a few places.

    Here are a few earlier GoGirlfriend articles about clothing-optional places:

  7. Belgium’s second nude beach will open in summer 2021

    Belgium is located just south of the Netherlands and north of France. It has 2/3 of the population of its neighbor to the north, and beaches on the English Channel just like those two neighbors. But unlike the Netherlands – where most beaches have a clothing-optional section – Belgium has had only one “official” naturist beach (Bredene, which was not open in 2020 because of COVID-19). In addition, there are only about a half dozen naturist campgrounds and parks. (Lists here and here.)

    However, things are looking up when warmer temperatures arrive in 2021. According to the article, “nudism enthusiasts will be able to plop down in Middelkerke, after the municipality decided to reserve parts of its coastal strip to the country’s nudist community.” Having just a single official nude beach wasn’t a tremendous hardship, as the new one is only about 8 km (5 miles) from the older one, a 15-minute trip by car. In the U. S., coastal beaches that allow nudity are hundreds of miles apart, in most cases. But 2 is twice as good as 1. So, why the change? As is often the case, tourists and the local economy are key considerations – as the Mayor of Middelkerke candidly stated.

    Chambers of Commerce and tourist bureaus in U. S. beach locations really need to get a clue. The heavy lifting here in the States seems mostly left to ad hoc local grassroots groups of naturists, such as Tampa Bay Free Beaches. And that sometimes works, as the example of Blind Creek Beach demonstrates.